The Legislature Today

On The Legislature Today, House Speaker Tim Armstead has announced he will step down from the West Virginia House of Delegates in 2019, and is considering a run for the state Supreme Court in 2020.

We also bring you another reporter roundtable with host Andrea Lannom, Brad McElhinny of MetroNews, and Jake Zuckerman of the Charleston Gazette-Mail to chat about what’s happened at the statehouse this week and what’s to come.

On The Legislature Today, we chat with state Department of Health and Human Resources Cabinet Secretary Bill Crouch about a massive reorganization bill that was introduced in the House of Delegates. The bill would divide DHHR into four separate agencies.

On The Legislature Today, we bring you a special focus on West Virginia’s opioid epidemic. First, we take you to the small town of Kermit where the tragic toll of the epidemic has weighed heavily on residents, and then, host Andrea Lannom chats with two lawmakers who outline legislation addressing the issue on multiple fronts.

On The Legislature Today, host Andrea Lannom talks with House Finance Committee Chairman Delegate Eric Nelson and Senate Majority Leader Ryan Ferns on the current budget situation in West Virginia – where we are now and where we’re headed.

On the Legislature Today, Senate President Mitch Carmichael and House Speaker Tim Armstead join host Andrea Lannom to discuss some of the biggest issues so far this session:

On The Legislature Today, some noteworthy action has already taken place, and it's only day three of the 2018 state Legislative session.

From chocolate kisses replacing last year's platter of manure, to a senator’s resignation, to the Chief Justice's appearance before lawmakers – we’ll break it all down.

On the first episode of this season's The Legislature Today, new host Andrea Lannom discusses Governor Jim Justice’s second State of the State address, followed by the Democratic Response, given by Sen. Minority Leader Roman Prezioso and House Minority Leader Tim Miley.   

Andrea Lannom
Daniel Walker / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For the first time, West Virginia Public Broadcasting is moving its nightly broadcast about the state Legislature to the state Capitol building itself. 

 

Celebrating Beth Vorhees

Apr 28, 2017

WVPB news anchor and journalist Beth Vorhees is retiring today. We invite you to watch this look back on her three decades of excellence covering West Virginia public affairs:

On The Legislature Today, Gov. Jim Justice has extended the regular session by one day to allow lawmakers more time to work on a budget bill, but he says its unlikely the House and Senate will be able to complete a budget in that time that he would actually sign. 

The governor discusses a likely special budget session, the bills he'll present lawmakers on a session call, and his gasoline tax increase that Justice says has been "childishly" pulled from consideration in the House.

On The Legislature Today, Gov. Jim Justice has signed a proclamation to extend the regular session by one day, allowing lawmakers more time to come to a budget agreement.

During a press conference at the Capitol today, Justice said he was disappointed that a budget compromise hadn’t already been reached.

On The Legislature Today, medical  marijuana is one step closer to becoming legal in West Virginia after a vote in the House, but the latest version of the bill delays the program until 2019.

In the Senate, members vote unanimously to add an abortion restriction to the state’s telemedicine law.

On The Legislature Today, members of the House and Senate are being presented with their budget bills which the Senate Finance Chairs says look almost nothing alike.

Still, he maintains the Legislature could pass a budget by Day 60.

On The Legislature Today, a bill to legalize medical marijuana in the state is bypassing the committee process, putting it on the fast track for a vote in the House.

The vote Thursday night has been called historic in the chamber, but several delegates argued pulling the bill out of the committee process was the only way members would get to vote in a medical marijuana bill this session.

On The Legislature Today, Governor Jim Justice says budget negotiations have broken down between Democrats and House leadership after talks this week.

Justice said they were near a deal when House Republicans refused to put about $45 million in tax increases to a vote in the chamber.

On The Legislature Today, there are several bills making their way through the legislative process that lawmakers are counting on to balance their respective budgets.

Meanwhile, many of those same lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are in talks with Gov. Jim Justice about how to close a budget gap millions of dollars wide. Jason Pizatella, Gov. Justice’s Deputy Chief of Staff, discusses how those negotiations are going so far.

On The Legislature Today, Republican House leadership's budget plan, according to Finance Chair Eric Nelson, aims to protect higher education from additional budget cuts after lawmakers initially announced they’d reduce funding to the system by $50 million.

West Virginia University President Gordon Gee sat down with me earlier today to discuss the potential budget implications for his university.

On The Legislature Today, both the House and Senate are working on their own tax reform measures that rely on changes to the sales and personal income taxes. 

On the Legislature Today, members of the House Finance Committee consider two bills that would help balance the 2018 budget, one to lower the overall sales tax rate while getting rid of some exemptions, the other to capture some dollars from the state's Road Fund and increase the beer barrel tax.

Across the rotunda in a Senate committee, members have advanced a bill to create a medical marijuana program in West Virginia, allowing doctors to prescribe the illegal drug for medicinal use.

On The Legislature Today, there are several pieces of legislation making their way through the statehouse to expand broadband internet access in West Virginia.

According to the Federal Communications Commission, 30 percent of West Virginians do not have access to federally defined broadband internet. That's why two West Virginia groups have joined together to promote expansion in any way possible.

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