John Shott

John Shott
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

House Bill 2966 would put together an independent panel and create the West Virginia Sentencing Commission.

It was taken up by the House Judiciary Committee Monday afternoon and is sponsored by House Speaker Tim Armstead.

Kelli Sobonya
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill increasing penalties for drug traffickers was largely the focus of the House floor session Friday. The bill is part of the House leadership’s plans to crack down on people selling drugs in West Virginia to curb the substance abuse epidemic.

House Bill 2648 would increase the penalties for trafficking or manufacturing a controlled substance while in the presence of a minor, making it a felony. The bill carries a penalty of a three year prison term without the ability to receive parole. 

On The Legislature Today, hundreds of pieces of legislation get introduced each legislative session and the House and Senate Judiciary Chairs see most of them. Sen. Charles Trump and Del. John Shott discuss some of those bills, including the ones they call their top priority-- those that deal with substance abuse.

Del. Shott says the House has taken the lead on those bills, which include some to increase penalties for those bringing drugs into the state as well as those selling them.

Sen. Trump says its an issue that plagues the entire state and lawmakers are doing their best to tackle the issue from all sides. 

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The House of Delegates voted on its first bill of the 2017 state Legislative Session Wednesday – one of many ethics bills expected to move through the chamber this year.

House Bill 2006 increases the penalties for someone who violates West Virginia’s Whistle-Blower Law.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Leaders in West Virginia’s House of Delegates say they plan to strengthen a number of ethics laws in West Virginia this legislative session. The first piece of legislation making its way through that chamber this year is House Bill 2006, increasing penalties for violating the state’s Whistle-Blower Law.