Inside Appalachia

24 City Employees Laid Off in Huntington

Jan 27, 2017
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Clark Davis reports from Huntington where layoffs in the police and fire departments have been announced to deal with the city’s budget deficit and Blitzen Trapper is along with the Mountain Stage song of the week.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, voters in Pennsylvania’s coal country are looking to President Donald Trump to promote the industry and members of the Frankfort High School band are getting ready to march in today’s inaugural parade in Washington. 

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, reporter Glynis Board profiles Wilbur Ross.  President-elect Trump’s choice to lead the Department of Commerce has a history in the Ohio Valley and we’ll re-visit a conversation between two pastors who reflect on Dr. Martin Luther King Junior.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Beth Vorhees previews her television interview with Governor Earl Ray Tomblin that airs on West Virginia Public Broadcasting this weekend and we’ll preview this weekend’s Inside Appalachia hearing from supporters and opponents of President-elect Donald Trump.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Anne Li / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Appalachia voted overwhelmingly for Donald Trump. He won 95% of the counties here. On this week’s Inside Appalachia, we speak with Trump supporters and opponents about how a Trump presidency will impact our region.

Photo by Crystal Good

Ever hear the word 'Affrilachian'? In the 1990s, a poet in Kentucky named Frank X Walker came up with the term. It refers to African Americans living in Appalachia. 

“To us it was about making the invisible visible, or giving voice to a previously muted or silenced voice,” Walker told the Appalachian Studies Association during its 2016 conference at Shepherd University.

NPR Keeps an Eye on Coal Miners Health

Dec 16, 2016
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, an interview with NPR investigative reporter Howard Berkes who has found a sharp increase in the number of coal miners with black lung disease and JD Souther and Nellie McKay are along with our Mountain Stage song of the week.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Benny Becker/Ohio Valley ReSource

NPR revealed this week that more coal miners in Appalachia are suffering from black lung than National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health reports. Inside Appalachia Host Jessica Lilly spoke with NPR investigative reporter Howard Berkes about the points raised in his report.


U.S. National Archive Jack Corn

We all have a unique way of talking- and here in Appalachia, we have many ways of being understood, and misunderstood, because of our language.

It stretches across race lines - and the judgment of one’s language can reveal classism, racism or both. This week’s episode of Inside Appalachia explores one of the ways people are judged: language.   

Courtesy of Hazel Shrader

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we're taking a look at the myths and truths of the wild turkey, thanks to the folks at the podcast With Good Reason. We’ll find out if turkeys really can fly, meet a man who became a “turkey mother,” and find out what color turkey went out of style.

MOUNTAIN STAGE/PAT SERGENT

Music has traditionally played a big role in the culture of Appalachia, and it seems that other countries are taking notice of the region’s rich musical tradition. In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll hear from the tourism music trail in West Virginia called The Mountain Music Trail (MMT) Since we last heard from them, they have grown. The MMT recently was a finalist in the British Guild of Travel Writers 2016 tourism initiative awards in the “wider word” category, and was recognized as one of the top three destinations in the world. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning Roxy Todd talks to a travel writer in London who’s a big fan of the state’s Mountain Music Trail and Larry Groce reflects on R.E.M’s appearance on Mountain Stage 25 years ago.

R.E.M. has now released Out of Time – The 25th Anniversary Deluxe Edition.  It’s a four disc set that for the first time features the recordings of the band’s appearance on Mountain Stage in 1991.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Jess Mador / WOUT/Truckbeat

Kristina “Breezy” Weaver  lives in Wyoming County, which has one of the highest drug overdose death rates in a state that leads the country in drug overdose deaths. Last June, Weaver’s father died of a heroin overdose.

Courtesy

For a generation of Appalachians, growing up with a parent addicted or abusing drugs is a way of life. On this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, we hear from men and women who have experienced the effects of opioid addiction and of the innocence that this epidemic has claimed.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, we’ll profile Charlotte Pritt, the Mountain Party’s candidate for governor and we’ll hear from a young Wyoming County woman whose father struggled with addiction and died of a heroin overdose last year. 

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

courtesy

For a generation of Appalachians, growing up with a parent addicted or abusing drugs is a way of life. Kristina Weaver, or Breezie, grew up in southern West Virginia with a loving family and father who struggled with addiction. Her father, David Siers, died in June of 2015 of a heroin overdose.


Scotty White / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Appalachia has some of the best settings for scary stories, including dark underground coal mines and remote forests. There are hundreds of remarkably bizarre, mysterious ghost tales that take place here in West Virginia.

Attorneys General Meet to Combat Drug Abuse

Oct 28, 2016
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, in honor of Halloween, we’ll have a story about the Philippi mummies and Billy Bragg and Joe Henry bring us the Mountain Stage song of the week.

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Mountain Stage is one of the longest running live music performance shows on public radio.  It began in 1983 and has featured nearly 2,000 acts from more than 50 countries--and nearly every conceivable genre. With such a storied history, there is little doubt the show has helped to create a lot of memories over the years.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, from Kentucky reporter Nicole Erwin has the story about complaints from residents there over a large scale hog operation and Ashton Marra talks with a political science professor from California about the impact of candidate endorsements.

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

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