Health

Sarah Jane Sanders

Candy, candy canes, candy corn and syrup. Those are the four basic food groups according to Buddy the Elf. And this time of year, the gluttonous season, it seems like he is onto something.

But researchers say that mindful eating --choosing quality over quantity and savoring your meals instead of, say, plowing through another pint of Ben & Jerry’s while watching “Westworld” -- can make a difference.

Roxy Todd/ WVPB

What happens to a community as coal jobs go away? Here are some things you might expect: many people leave, schools empty, local businesses struggle to keep their lights on. But here’s something that may not come to mind: extra curricular sports go away.

That’s what happened to children in McDowell County over 25 years ago. They lost their local soccer league. And while the thousands of lost coal jobs may not come back, thanks to a 4-H project, and about a dozen volunteers, soccer is making a comeback in McDowell County.

Drug Addiction in Politics
Alexandra Kanik / Ohio Valley ReSource

The opioid epidemic is on the agenda for political campaigns from the presidential race down to the local level in the Ohio Valley region. Election Day could shape the response to the crisis in states with some of the nation’s highest rates of addiction and overdoses.

Pat Fogarty, Director of Business Development and Mission Advancement at The Healing Place treatment center in Louisville said he’s seen the political discussion about addiction change for the better.

On this week's episode, we’ll hear from a midwife who started delivering babies in the early 1970's. We find out what it’s like to deliver a baby at home. And we speak with one doctor about why she opposes home birth. We also visit a famous hippie commune in Appalachia that's said to be the birthplace of modern midwifery.


Volunteer smiles as she talks about why she traveled for five days to help West Virginian flood victims
Chuck Roberts/ WVPB

More than 1,000 homeowners in 12 counties are reporting they are in need of volunteer support as they try to clean up their homes and rebuild following historic June Flooding.

Hundreds if not thousands of volunteers have already donated their time to help, 200 of them through AmeriCorps, a national service organization. 

Daniel Walker/ WVPB

As the coal industry in Appalachia continues to decline, more and more families are struggling. Poor job prospects throughout the region are causing a lot of anxiety in families. And mental health expects say that kind of stress can accumulatively lead to mental illness. What can parents do to help their children cope with stress?

Jeff Pierson

Two artists that were featured on Inside Appalachia recently had their work recognized- and we think that's worth celebrating. So this week we're revisiting one of our favorite episodes from earlier this year- Inside Appalachia Road Trip: Art and Murals Across Appalachia's Backroads.

401(K) 2012 / www.401kcalculator.org

A new ranking of West Virginia Counties based on health outcomes shows Jefferson County ranks among the best and McDowell among the worst.

Democratic Senators continued with attempts to slow or kill a bill that repeals the state's prevailing wage, but the GOP majority maintains the bill will help West Virginia's economy.

Sean O'Leary with the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy and John Deskins with the West Virginia University Bureau of Business and Economic Research discuss the possible economic impacts of the bill that will be up for passage in the Senate Thursday.

In light of the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan, this week on Inside Appalachia we remember the West Virginia water crisis from 2014. We’ll also hear from people in the coalfields who don’t have access to clean water, day in and day out. And we’ll honor the traditional “Appalachian” way of coming together to lean on each other.

Cabell Huntington Health Department
Clark Davis / WV Public Broadcasting

The Executive Council for the West Virginia Association of Local Health Departments met Wednesday to discuss the effects of the proposed $4 million in funding cuts to local public health services for fiscal year 2017 as outlined in Governor Tomblin’s budget proposal to the legislature last week.

Image composite by Mountain Messenger

Marshall and West Virginia universities have partnered to support health-related research projects through a new grant program. Each university has pledged $250,000 a year for three years, which will eventually total $1.5 million.

The grant program, which was announced in August, is designed to support research to “better serve West Virginians,” and to attract future funding from outside sources, according to a Wednesday press release. 

Molly Must/ Traveling 219

This week for Inside Appalachia, we wanted to go on a kind of road trip and meet people who are making community art across Appalachia. 

Daniel Walker/WVPB

In 2013, the West Virginia Center for Children’s Justice launched a program called Handle With Care. The collaborative  program is meant to help children who’ve experienced abuse, neglect or other types of trauma succeed in school. The program that started on the West Side of Charleston is now expanding across the state and in other communities across the nation.

401(K) 2012 / www.401kcalculator.org

An advocacy group says declines in uncompensated care have saved West Virginia hospitals millions of dollars.

State data compiled by West Virginians for Affordable Health Care show more than two dozen hospitals saved a total of more than $265 million from 2013 to 2014.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

West Virginia health officials are reporting a spike in the disease commonly known as whooping cough.

According to the Charleston Gazette-Mail, the Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR) reports 52 confirmed cases of pertussis in West Virginia so far this year. That's up from 18 cases last year and 19 cases in 2013.

Wikimedia Commons / US Government

Former West Virginia Secretary of State and U.S. Rep. Ken Hechler says his health is improving and he hopes that he will soon be released from the hospital.

Ken Hechler's wife, Carol Hechler, said the 101-year-old was rushed to the hospital on Wednesday because he was experiencing some internal bleeding and had a seizure. He was eventually transferred to another hospital in Maryland.

Andy Todd

Food deserts: it’s more than just an urban issue. Hey, we all have to eat. This week, we’re bringing you an encore presentation from the Inside Appalachia archives about Appalachian food deserts.  In Appalachia, where green forests grow abundantly, food is scarce for many. Throughout Appalachia, grocery stores are disappearing. This week on Inside Appalachia we're looking at some ways communities are resolving to take matters in their own hands.

APT/WTVS

Get the information you need to protect your family from heart disease--watch Thursday, September 17 at 9:30 p.m.

HEART 411 reveals what every man and woman needs to know about the #1 killer in the United States — heart disease. Two of the top cardiac doctors in the country – cardiac surgeon Marc Gillinov, MD and cardiologist Steven Nissen, MD — outline keys to preventing heart disease and stroke, uncover the truth about current tests and treatments, and reveal the future of cardiac surgery and care. 

On West Virginia Morning, the state Board of Education is moving forward with a controversial plan to close and consolidate some schools in Fayette County.  Also, there’s a new program being considered at West Virginia University to teach music therapy as a part of medical treatment.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

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