Gov. Jim Justice

Jim Justice
Steve Helber / AP

A lawsuit charges that two coal companies owned by West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice breached a contract with an exporting company.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice talks about his budget proposal during a stop on his Save Our State Tour on Thursday, March 3, 2017, at Fairmont State University.
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated: Saturday, May 26, 2018 at 10:10 p.m.

 

Gov. Jim Justice and his wife Cathy were involved in a vehicle accident Saturday in Beckley. According to a news release from the governor’s office, the couple were rear ended at an intersection while the governor’s Suburban was stopped at a stop light. Beckley City Police have charged the driver of the vehicle that crashed into the governor’s vehicle with diving under the influence.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice talks about his budget proposal during a stop on his Save Our State Tour on Thursday, March 3, 2017, at Fairmont State University.
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated: May 21, 2018 at 2:30 p.m.

 

Gov. Jim Justice has issued a call for a special session that will coincide with May interims. Lawmakers are being asked to address clean-ups to various bills passed during the 2018 session.

This Feb. 15, 2017 photo shows railroad tracks along the West Virginia town of Matoaka, which once carried coal trains several times a day and at night.
Michael Virtanen / AP

Two mines owned by West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice were among three across the state that missed the deadline for installing life-saving technology to prevent miners from being crushed by machinery in underground coal mines.

Wikimedia Commons

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice has issued a third executive order targeting state regulations.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports the Republican signed an executive order on Monday to expedite permit processes for industry, business and economic development projects. Justice says the goal is to speed up economic development by backing off overregulation and providing security for job creators.

The rise of entrepreneurship in West Virginia is one of the top 5 trends shaping our state in 2018.  

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

With the stroke of a pen, Gov. Jim Justice officially returned to the state’s Republican Party Friday afternoon.

The change came less than 24 hours after the governor announced his intention to flip parties during a Donald Trump campaign rally.

Governor Jim Justice switched parties again today, returning to the Republican roots he left in 2015.

On this special edition of the Front Porch podcast, we debate what this means for Justice, the Democratic and Republican parties and the state as a whole.

Darron Cummings / AP Photo

Democratic Gov. Jim Justice's announcement that he was switching parties came around 7:30 Thursday night, but word of his departure had already been leaked to national outlets like The New York Times and the Associated Press, and it wasn't long before members of both parties from the top down made their thoughts about the decision known.

Governor Jim Justice/Twitter

For the second time in two years, the Legislature and Governor are at loggerheads over the state budget. A government shutdown looms in less than two months.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia is one of the unhealthiest states in the nation. The state is also in the middle of a budget crisis that impacts critical health services. At the state level, the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources budget has been cut $181 million since 2015. Bill Crouch, the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources cabinet secretary, said any more cuts would result in a reduction of services.

“The reality is that many of these cuts will affect individuals and communities and providers in communities,” he said.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Note from WVPB News Director Jesse Wright: In the interest of avoiding a conflict of interest while also providing our audience with as much information as possible, WVPB’s newsroom is providing stories from other trusted news sources that directly affect WVPB reporters and funding.

Gov. Jim Justice has proposed continuing West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s $4.6 million state funding next year, reversing his February proposal to end it.