The Front Porch

This week, Inside Appalachia is hearing from people across the region, sharing their views about the Confederate Battle Flag.

Craig Cunningham / Charleston Daily Mail

Should the government require wages over a certain level for taxpayer-funded construction projects?

In West Virginia, some Republicans want to repeal the prevailing wage law altogether - like Laurie Lin of our podcast, "The Front Porch"

On The Front Porch podcast, we discuss the shooting at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C. with a special guest, WVU Vice President David Fryson.

Fryson is a pastor, a lawyer, and leads WVU’s Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.

We discuss the debate over taking down the Confederate flag, and enduring symbols of the Confederacy in West Virginia. That includes General Stonewall Jackson, a West Virginia native who fought for the South.

The Front Porch Podcast
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Increasingly, working class men in Appalachia can't find work.

Central Appalachia has seen thousands of layoffs in the coal industry this decade. More and more, women are the main breadwinners.

Should we require drug tests for recipients of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program?

A bill proposed by the West Virginia Legislature would have done just that, as part of a pilot program. It failed to pass, but is sure to come up in next year's regular session.

CDC

A recent Gallup-Healthways survey ranked West Virginia as the second-most obese state in America (thank God for Mississippi!) One in three West Virginians is obese.

This week on The Front Porch, we debate what’s making Appalachia fat, and what can be done about it.

Rick Wilson of the American Friends Service Committee blames aggressive marketing of sugar, salt and fat by big corporations.

Roxy Todd / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia has the nation's worst rate of drug overdose deaths. It started with prescription painkillers, and now is increasingly fueled by heroin.

On this week's "The Front Porch," we debate what's causing the epidemic, and what might actually work in curbing it.

WNYC

As host and executive producer of the hit podcast "Death, Sex & Money" from WNYC, Anna Sale asks famous people and regular folks about the things we need to talk more about, but don't.

On this week's "The Front Porch," Sale talks about her complicated love of West Virginia, and the bittersweet experience of visiting home, once you know you're gone for good.

Target zeroes in on food, glorious food

May 18, 2015
Annie Baxter

Target, long the “cheap chic” destination for clothing and home furnishings, is trying to spruce up its grocery business at the expense of some of its big processed food suppliers by capitalizing on consumers’ growing preference for organic and natural foods over packaged foods.  

“Natural and organics has been growing mid-teens now for eight to 10 years,” says Brian Yarbrough, an analyst with Edward Jones. “And the center of the aisle, the cereal, the chips, the cookies, the crackers, the soups of the world — they’re barely seeing volume growth at all.”

Tax Foundation

Reforming the tax system is a major priority for the new GOP leadership of the West Virginia Legislature. Senate President Bill Cole has even floated the idea of eliminating the state income tax.

Like the cicadas, the issue seems to come up every few years, sometimes leading to changes, and sometimes not.

This week, The Front Porch gang debates whether West Virginia needs to change its tax system, and if so, who should benefit.

    

Is Appalachia the most racist place in America?

A story in the Washington Post this week suggests that, based on a study done of Google searches of the "N" word. It appears there are more such searches in Appalachia than almost anywhere else.

Is racism worse in Appalachia than elsewhere? If not, what's going on?

http://photographyisnotacrime.com

Jesse and Marisha Camp were driving through McDowell County when they were confronted by angry residents who believed they were taking photos of their children.

Hard times have come yet again to the coalfields of West Virginia -- massive layoffs, big cuts in production. The coal severance tax is down by about half in many coal counties.

That's what we're talking about this week on “The Front Porch”, our podcast where we bring together people with diverse views and backgrounds to see where we can find common ground.

Pages