The Front Porch

There’s evidence Donald Trump may be more popular in West Virginia than any other state.

  The death of Justice Antonin Scalia leaves a huge vacancy in the U.S. Supreme Court. Whoever fills the position could impact the President's Clean Power Plan, abortion rights and the direction of the court for a generation.

PBS

Amber Miller admits she was no angel. She hung out with the wrong crowd. She used drugs.

When she was 20, she went to prison for stealing $30 from her grandmother.

But 12 years later, she is still labeled as a felon. And that's hurt her ability to find work.

A bi-partisan group of state lawmakers is sponsoring a "second chance" bill. It would allow first-time, non-violent felons to ask a judge to expunge their record a certain time after release.

Does the Religious Freedom Restoration Act protect religious expression, or allow people to discriminate against certain groups?

On this Snowmaggedon edition of The Front Porch:

1. A huge snowball fight breaks out over Right to Work, and whether it is right for West Virginia

2. Does Sen. Chris Walter's bill to expand broadband internet access stand a snowball's chance in hell? Should it?

What do Don Blankenship, heroin, and pepperoni rolls have in common? They’re all on our highly-unscientific list of top stories for 2015.

West Virginia is likely to become the 26th “right-to-work” state when the legislature meets in January. GOP leaders say they have the votes, and they can override Gov. Tomblin’s veto with a simple majority.

How would passing a right-to-work (RTW) law change West Virginia?

Jody Lee Hunt gunned down his ex-girlfriend, two of her lovers and his main competitor in one day. The 2014 slayings near Morgantown are just one example of mass shootings in America.

But are mass shootings more common in gun-rich Appalachia? And are we more likely to target strangers or the people we know and love?

Find out by listening to this week's episode of The Front Porch podcast.

Danny Lyon / US National Archives

On this  episode of the Inside Appalachia podcast, we talk immigration, migration and what it could all mean for Appalachia.

 

lifelinesyria.ca

W.Va. Delegate Joshua Nelson, R-Boone, has launched a petition seeking to stop Syrian refugees from coming into America, at least until better safeguards are in place.

His experience serving in the military informed his decision, he said.

"Most people in that area just want to live peaceful lives. I've served with Middle Eastern people, Islamic people, that had my back," Nelson said

"But, in regards to what happened in Paris, these guys are posing as Syrian refugees. Until we are certain that (screening) process is adequate, we have to be very careful."

Last week, The Front Porch focused on the issue of school consolidation, in light of the ongoing fight in Fayette County.

Many people took issue with the fact that we had no one from Fayette County on the show. So we're hoping to rectify that with this follow-up podcast.

Craig Cunningham / Charleston Gazette-Mail

As Fayette County fights over school consolidation, The Front Porch gang questions whether the promises made about school consolidation ever came true.*

Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum, West Virginia Penitentiary,  Mothman...our region has a long list of haunts and haints.

David Grubb via Facebook

        

What impact will President Obama's new strategy have on the epidemic of prescription painkiller abuse and heroin use in West Virginia and Appalachia?

State Lawmakers Consider Substance Abuse

Oct 19, 2015

On West Virginia Morning, Liz McCormick reports on efforts being considered by state lawmakers to address substance abuse.  Also, Greenbrier hotel owner Jim Justice is running for governor, but he’s taking criticism for not paying his coal company taxes in eastern Kentucky. 

These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Fotolia DollarPhoto Club

    

West Virginia has the worst unemployment rate in the nation. Patriot Coal warned 2,000+ employees they might be losing their jobs.

What can West Virginia do to turn things around?

Rick Wilson

A deep love of their homeplace, resourcefulness, and deep faith - West Virginians and people in Gaza, the West Bank and Israel share a lot.

Midwives have a long and storied history in Appalachia. Can they help decrease the region’s high C-section rate?

Charleston Gazette-Mail

He’s been beaten and berated for doing his job, but despite the dangers, Bob Aaron says he still loves being a T.V. reporter.

Ten years ago, Jennifer Hill was trying to figure out how she, her mother and brother could survive Hurricane Katrina.

Pages