Food

Scotty White/ Inside Appalachia

The Jewish holiday of Hanukkah began December 6, and continues through December 14th at sundown. In light of Hanukkah, this week's show features Jewish Appalachians, a group that’s not really talked about a whole lot.

Jewish communities across West Virginia are struggling to keep their traditions alive.

Gabrielle Marshall

A group of students from the University of Notre Dame just came to West Virginia for fall break. Instead of relaxing with friends, as many college students do, these guys got a taste of life in a food desert.

Andrea Booher / Wikimedia Commons

In July, the United States House of Representatives voted on House Resolution 1599, the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act. It passed the House and has now moved on to the Senate. If passed into law, it would create a federal voluntary labeling standard for genetically modified foods or those with genetically modified ingredients. Labeling would also be regulated by the FDA. Here in West Virginia, there’s been some talk and show of concern from some over this bill, including a group in the Eastern Panhandle.

On West Virginia Morning, we’ll meet the Vagabond Chef. Matt Welsh of Wheeling recently took a motorcycle trip through 39 counties to find the best cuisine.  And we’ll feature a performance by bluegrass group The 1937 Flood in tribute to radio host Joe Dobbs.  That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

The Revivalist: Word From the Appalachian South

Appalachian culture is becoming pretty hip, says Mark Lynn Ferguson, the creator of a blog called The Revivalist: Word From the Appalachian South. He called it the Revivalist because he’s seeing a revival of interest in Appalachian culture - and he also wants to help introduce the joys of life in Appalachia to more people. "I think the cultural influence outside the mountains has never been bigger," said Ferguson.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In June, Lunch Buses hit the streets for the first time in Jefferson County. Two months later, the initiative comes to a close with hopes to expand next year.

It can be pretty tough to be a young person in Appalachia. There’s a lot of love for our region in the younger generation, too. So some younger people are making their own opportunities. Hear from people in their teens and 20s who are creating art and music here and listen to their ideas and dreams for Appalachia.

Roxy Todd

The summer break from school can be really tough for some children whose parents can’t always afford to buy food. Summer lunch programs across the country try to help feed those children- but lots of children still go without because they can’t get to the school to eat.

USDA

In Appalachia, where green forests grow abundantly, food is scarce for many. Throughout Appalachia, grocery stores are disappearing. This week on Inside Appalachia we're looking at some ways communities are resolving to take matters in their own hands.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Lunch Buses started up Tuesday in Jefferson County bringing meals to children and seniors at designated locations. But on the first day, things didn’t go quite as planned.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, at a forum Monday night in Charleston, citizens asked state leaders for more treatment facilities for drug addiction.  As it happened, Governor Tomblin announced grants to expand access to these programs. Also, we begin a two part series about growing mushrooms in your own backyard.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Appalachian foodies will be interested to hear that the forests in Appalachia could be an ideal environment for growing mushrooms on logs in your own backyard.

The catch? It’s labor intensive, and if you want to sell your mushrooms to the public, you’ll need to show proof that your mushrooms are edible.

Still there are a handful of people in Appalachia who have been growing shiitake mushrooms for decades.

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we’re taking a road trip through the region to find people who are reviving the old recipes and bringing something fresh to our plates. This episode is also helping us kick off a new segment, called Appetite Appalachia, which features restaurants and recipes with Appalachian roots.

Charles Hayes

 

On a an overcast, October day a crowd of 600 people gather in the little town of Webster Springs. Twenty cooks and 20 Burgoos. 

Helping judge the best of these Burgoos is Tim Urbanic, chef and owner of Cafe Cimino.

 

“You got to love Burgoo. I really love the rattlesnake. And the snapping turtle. They're such heritage foods,” he said.

 

The crowd gets to choose a people's choice Burgoo too. Angie Cowger and Elissa Clayton are about to vote for their favorites.

 

Aracoma Miners Honored at Mine Academy

Oct 28, 2014
West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, in 2006 two miners died in a mine fire in Logan County.  Eight years later, a fire training facility is dedicated in their memory.  Also, noted food promoter the James Beard Foundation has honored five local food organizations in West Virginia.

Roxy Todd

It's early morning around 6 am, and I'm standing with Chef Tim Urbanic in the kitchen of the Cafe Cimino Country Inn. Tim grew up in western Pennsylvania in a coal camp, and his mother, Julia Cimino, was a first generation Italian immigrant from Calabria.

“The polenta was a staple in our family. This is a polenta that I've known all my life, since I was a little kid. We add to this Romano cheese, fresh butter, and then we use water for the base.”

Allender Stewart

In southern West Virginia, Reed's Mill has been stone-grinding local cornmeal since 1791. It's one of the few gristmills that has been in continual operation in this country, and it grinds a local heirloom corn that has been passed down for generations.

Lauren Stonestreet, of Elle Effect Photography

 

In this episode, we’ll travel to Maryland to forage- and eat- wild Pawpaws

And we’ll learn about Anne Braden, one of the early advocates for social equality in Kentucky.

We'll also hear about a new company in West Virginia that’s revived a historic salt-works -and why chefs are loving it.

Lauren Stonestreet, of Elle Effect Photography

 

In 1851, salt from the Kanawha Valley was awarded the world's best salt at the World's Fair in London. Now, more than 160 years later, one of those old salt companies has been revived by brother and sister Nancy Bruns and Lewis Payne. Last weekend, the JQ Dickinson Salt-Works celebrated their 1-year-anniversary. I toured the salt-works and talked with Chef April Hamilton as she prepared food for the salt soiree.

 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Ashton Marra reports about a proposed pipeline that would carry natural gas out of the state.  Also, September is National Preparedness Month.  Sarah Lowther Hensley reports how you can be prepared in an emergency.

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