Folk

Sarah Taylor

"We need to work to retain young musicians so we can continue to grow the scene from within."

Courtesy of the artist

"It’s fun to see how we can use the [WVU School of Music] techniques we spent so many years perfecting for something completely different. It’s interesting to show people what you can do with classical music."

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

 

Spellbinding folk with a captivating voice. It would only make sense for such a performance by Aoife O'Donovan to be titled "Magic Hour," one of the many songs we'll preview on this week's Mountain Stage broadcast.

We'll also hear performances by Old Crow Medicine Show crooner Willie Watson, Grammy-nominated country songwriter Brandy Clark, Chicago indie rockers Frances Luke Accord, and acclaimed Irish singer-songwriter John Doyle.

Tracie Peterson

Since the show began almost two years ago A Change of Tune has highlighted some of the best up-and-coming artists out of these West Virginia hills with podcast-y chats ranging from Tyler Childers to Ona, Teammate's Scott Simons to Jordan Andrew Jefferson and beyond.

But those interviews have been a bit infrequent, and since West Virginia Day is coming up (not to mention A Change of Tune’s second birthday), we thought we’d do something special: 30 days, 30 brand new #WVmusic interviews that range from Morgantown alt-rockers and Parkersburg singer-songwriters to West Virginia music venues and regional artist management and beyond, all of which contribute to this state’s wild and wonderful music scene.

January 27, 1933: Folk Artist Connard Wolfe Born in Kanawha County

Jan 27, 2016
Michael Keller via e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / Goldenseal

Folk artist Connard Wolfe was born at Standard in Kanawha County on January 27, 1933. The self-taught sculptor started carving wood and stone after being discharged from the army about 1955. His first significant carvings were stones for a wall and two headstones. Other early works included a gigantic reclining nude carved from a boulder in the hills near his home and two life-sized sculptures in tree trunks: ‘‘Mountain Girl’’ and ‘‘Standing Christ.’’ Both tree sculptures were later destroyed.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

This Valentine's Day weekend, let Mountain Stage be the Abigail Washburn to your Bela Fleck and the Julie Miller to your Buddy Miller. Broadcast from 1am-5am Saturday and Sunday mornings here on West Virginia Public Broadcasting, "Mountain Stage After Midnight" takes the best episodes from the show's 31 year history and shares their memories and songs with our late-night listeners. 

Hear some musically-minded couples this Saturday February 14 and Sunday February 15 on "Mountain Stage After Midnight."

Rhiannon Giddens

This past winter has been a hectic one for Carolina Chocolate Drops frontwoman Rhiannon Giddens. Between recording Dylan covers with Marcus Mumford and Elvis Costello under the moniker The New Basement Tapes and dueting with Iron & Wine's Sam Beam on NBC's Parenthood series finale, she's somehow found time to release her solo recording debut, Tomorrow is My Turn. If you're a fan of spellbinding interpretations of Americana classics, this interview and music are recommended for you.

Chris Graham

It's taken two years for Canadian singer-songwriter Andy Shauf's The Bearer of Bad News to reach the States, but now we can finally hear why this Saskatchewan crooner is being hailed as "the next Nick Drake." Without a doubt, Shauf's folk is the kind of folk that makes you pause. If you're a fan of lush, contemplative songwriting, this interview and music are recommended for you.

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

A pinch of folk, a dash of soul and a good dollop of bluegrass. Mix it all together and what do you get? This week's "Mountain Stage After Midnight!" Broadcast from 1am-5am Saturday and Sunday mornings here on West Virginia Public Broadcasting, "Mountain Stage After Midnight" takes the best episodes from the show's 31 year history and shares their memories and songs with our late-night listeners. Each week we'll hand-pick two of our favorite episodes that'll alternate order each night. 

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Rather than keeping to the ol' "Eat Better, Work Out More, Read More" New Year's mantra, why not spice up your resolution routine with "Hear More Rock'n Music?" We here at "Mountain Stage After Midnight" are more than happy to supply such music. Broadcast from 1am-5am Saturday and Sunday mornings here on West Virginia Public Radio, "Mountain Stage After Midnight" takes the best episodes from the show's 31 year history and shares their memories and songs with our late-night listeners.

Payram

This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews Piers Faccini, an English singer-songwriter who specializes in intimate folk. Although his bedside folk style invokes comparisons to Nick Drake, Ray LaMontainge and even Jack Johnson, Faccini shows he’s more than just a quiet voice by infusing his music with Delta blues, Mediterranean melodies and neo-classical compositions. His new record with French cellist Vincent Segal, titled Songs of Time Lost, goes to prove why Faccini stands out from the folky crowd.

John Londono

 

This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews Andrew Barr of The Barr Brothers, an up-and-coming Canadian quartet with roots in American folk, African desert, Delta blues and classical string, to say the least. The band's newest record, Sleeping Operator, just goes to prove that The Barr Brothers are the Ra Ra Riot of transcendental folk. Check out the interview below to learn more about the band, their longform music style and their connections to alt music friends The War on Drugs and of Montreal. If you're a fan of sprawling soundscapes that are as much warm as they are catchy (see: Bahamas), this interview and music are recommended for you.

Sara Mourner

This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews The Ericksons, a Minneapolis-based indie folk band comprised of sisters Jenny Kochsiek and Bethany Valentini. After a number of family losses, the two women finally came together to channel their love and grief into achingly beautiful folk music, as seen with the band's newest release Bring Me Home. Check out the interview below to find out more about The Ericksons' history, the band's connections to folk visionaries Justin Vernon and S.

This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews Bahamas, the pseudonym for singer-songwriter Afie Jurvanen. Although Bahamas is far from being Bahamian (hint: Jurvanen hails from the non-Caribbean lands of Canada), his effortlessly beautiful folk will make you believe you're surrounded by sun and sand.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For many West Virginians, the banjo represents a sense of home. That’s certainly the case for Shepherdstown-based musician, Chelsea McBee. The 29-year-old banjo player is a regular on the West Virginia music scene now, but that wasn’t always her plan.