Federal Shutdown

Secretary of Revenue Robert Kiss
Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports on Governor Tomblin's call for a bill that would insulate businesses and individuals from another federal shutdown, Glynis Board has more on the Israeli Consul General's visit to a Morgantown synagogue, Concord student Chad Brown bring us more on a college "prep rally", and more.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

From the Associated Press: Congress has passed legislation to reopen the partially-shuttered federal government and avert a potentially disastrous default on U.S. obligations, clearing the measure for President Barack Obama's promised signature.

Passage of the bill late Wednesday in the House and Senate ended a Washington-created crisis that closed much of government for 16 days. It came on the eve of the date the Treasury Department warned it would no longer be able to borrow to pay the government's bills.

West Virginia Morning - October 15, 2013

Oct 15, 2013

On this WV Morning, Ashton Marra reports on Senator Joe Manchin's ideas on how to get the government funded, and Glynis Board brings us a feature on the first annual WV tatto expo. Those stories and more!

Twelve Senators are reaching across the aisle on a deal to end the government shutdown and increase the federal debt limit before Thursday, the day the country would likely default on its debts if Congress doesn’t act. One of the 12, Senator Joe Manchin said default is not an option.

by Rob Elliott / Arizona Raft Adventures

Kathy Zerkle is a river ranger for the National Park Service who works in Fayette County in New River Park, and, you guessed it, she’s out of work these days. Furloughed. And while she’s concerned about what that means for the safety and well-being of the New River Park and the public that visit, and her personal future financially, she’s also concerned about how the government shutdown impacts the Grand Canyon—or at least her ability to experience it.

Ashton Marra

A majority of the furloughed West Virginia National Guard members and support staff are returning to work this week because of a movement in Congress to extend military pay to reserve members.

But the state’s top-ranking Guard official said a return to work doesn’t mean those members, and the overall safety of the state, won’t continue to be affected by the federal government shut down.

“The Guard in West Virginia will overcome obstacles and we’ll make things happen to take care of our people in this state, but we shouldn’t have to operate this way.”

West Virginia Agriculture Commissioner Walt Helmick said Tuesday the partial federal government shutdown won't affect his agency's operations.
 
     Helmick said  in a news release that the Department of Agriculture is continuing daily inspections at livestock slaughter and processing facilities.
 
     The department also is continuing surveillance of egg and dairy products, testing poultry flocks for disease and conducting other routine activities.
 

The United Mine Workers is reminding miners to stay safe during the government shut down. Three miners died in just as many days over the weekend. 

UMWA president Cecil Roberts is urging all miners to be especially careful at work.

Roberts said, “check on your buddy,” and “watch each other's back.”

On Friday 62-year-old Roger R. King from Moundsville was killed after an accident at CONSOL Energy's McElroy mine in Marshall County. He was employed as a longwall maintenance coordinator and had 42 years of mining experience.

On this West Virginia Morning, Jessica Lilly details one mine safety advocate's concerns over the federal shutdown, Cecelia Mason reports on a study on health and wellness in the Eastern Panhandle, and Glynis Board has more on WVU President James Clements' State of the University address.

The federal Mine Safety and Health Administration is inevitably affected by the standoff in Washington. MSHA is partially open with less than half the staff.

U.S. Senators Joe Manchin and Jay Rockefeller, along with 48 other senators and Congressman Nick Rahall (all D-W.Va.) sent a letter today to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel urging that the National Guard and Reserves, and the civilians who support our troops, receive pay during the government shutdown. 

Rt 219 Project

One of the most immediate effects of the federal government shutdown hits tourists.

A record number of raptors flew over an observation point in West Virginia recently.

A story teller puts a new twist on old Appalachian traditions.

And a Kentucky school program helps who want to children learn music.

Government shutdown affects....bass fishing?

Oct 4, 2013
fishing
Ben Adducchio

With a shutdown in the United States government, nearly one million employees are not able to work. But in northern West Virginia, area fishermen and women are also feeling that pinch.

West Virginia Morning - October 4, 2013

Oct 4, 2013

On this West Virginia Morning, Clark Davis brings a story of obesity and research that is changing how we look at it. Plus, bass fishers are shut down? Those stories and more. 

David McKinley, member of US House of Representatives, March 2012
United States Congress

First District Congressman David McKinley says he’s wanting better communication with members of the Senate, on how to end the government shutdown that’s left close to one million federal workers unable to work. McKinley says the issues behind negotiations deal with health care and the economy.

Freedom's Run

The federal government shutdown could possibly impact the upcoming Freedom’s Run marathon in the Eastern Panhandle if the shutdown is still going on at the end of next week. But the Marathon will continue regardless of whether the government’s closed.

This is the fifth year for the marathon and one of its main attractions is the route it takes through four national parks. Those parks are closed because of the federal government shutdown. But there is a contingency plan.

 

 

  

Today U.S. Senator Joe Manchin delivered a speech on the Senate floor to discuss the government shutdown. He apologized for ongoing political antics and reiterated the call for House Speaker John Boehner to call a vote on a clean continuing resolution bill.

On this WV Morning, Ben Adducchio reports on what West Virginia’s delegation to the U.S. House is thinking as the government shutdown continues into day two, and Cecelia Mason reports the director of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies at Shepherd University is appalled at the way Congress is handling the appropriations process. That and more.

Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies

As the wrangling between the House and Senate, Democrats and Republicans over whether to fund the budget and whether to tie changes in the Affordable Care Act to that funding continues, the Director of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies at Shepherd University, Ray Smock, is appalled at the way Congress is handling the appropriations process.

Adjutant General James Hoyer of the West Virginia National Guard
Dave Mistich

Adjutant General James Hoyer of the West Virginia National Guard said of the more than 2,300 full time guardsmen and women that would have gone back to work Tuesday, 1,150 of them were sent home because of the shutdown of the federal government.

Hoyer said jobs affected by the shutdown include everything from mechanics to pilots. He expressed frustrations over not being able to protect the pay of the men and women who he said are responsible for protecting the nation and state.