Environmental Protection Agency

Tower for drilling horizontally into the Marcellus Shale Formation for natural gas, from Pennsylvania Route 118 in eastern Moreland Township, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, USA
Ruhrfisch [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)

The federal Environmental Protection Agency issued a report this week pertaining to the possible effects of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water. The report comes after several years of analyzing literature and research, but findings were largely inconclusive.


Shelley Moore Capito and Joe Manchin joined four other U.S. senators to unveil new legislation aimed at pushing back on proposed federal clean air regulations.

 

Standing beside four other Republican senators and Democrat Joe Manchin, Shelley Moore Capito introduced the The Affordable Reliable Energy Now Act on Wednesday, May 13, at a press conference in Washington, D.C. 

W.Va.'s AG to Argue EPA Standards in Federal Court

Apr 15, 2015
Janet Kunicki / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Attorney General Patrick Morrisey’s office will present oral arguments before a U.S. Court of Appeals Thursday fighting the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed carbon emission standards. 

The proposed standards were released for comment last summer by the federal EPA. They would require states across the country to reduce their carbon emissions by 30 percent in 15 years, focusing particularly on emissions from coal-fired power plants.

  The federal Environmental Protection Agency’s public comment period on proposed stricter ozone standards closes this week. Many health and medical professionals across the country are urging the EPA to adopt the standard. Meanwhile, West Virginia’s senator Joe Manchin introduced legislation that would block the measure.


West Virginia Legislative Services

Friday in the House, three bills were up for passage. First was House Bill 2004, which would require a procedure for the development of a state plan in regard to the Clean Air Act.

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

  The Obama administration is delaying for months a final rule to control carbon dioxide emissions at new coal-fired power plants.

A final rule was due by law on Jan. 8. But the EPA announced Wednesday it would wait until mid-summer.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has vowed to overturn the emissions rules. He tried in January 2014 when Democrats controlled the chamber. But Congress' investigative arm said he would have to wait for a final rule.

 Arch Coal is continuing to fight a 2011 veto of a West Virginia strip mining permit.

Late last month in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, Arch's Mingo Logan Coal Co. subsidiary filed an appeal notice for the Spruce No. 1 mine case.

In 2011, the Environmental Protection Agency retroactively vetoed the mine's permit, which the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued four years earlier.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

State environmental regulators and leaders of the coal and power industries announced yesterday they’d filed comments on the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed rules that aim to reduce carbon emissions.

Governor Tomblin said the Department of Environmental protection worked with the West Virginia Division of Energy and the state Public Service Commission in filing a nearly 70 page document responding to the proposed rules . At a news conference Monday, Tomblin called those rules “unprecedented” and “illegal.”

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Monday is the final day the federal Environmental Protection Agency will accept comments on their proposed rule to limit carbon emissions from coal fired power plants.

The EPA announced the rule in June of this year aimed at cutting CO2 emissions for the country by 30 percent by 2030. Individually if the rule were approved as is, West Virginia would have to cut its emissions by 15 percent compared to 2012 measurements.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  The Environmental Protection Agency has begun air monitoring at an industrial site in Charleston that fouled public drinking water supplies to 300,000 customers in January.

Unveiled Friday, the monitoring will be done at the Freedom Industries plant along the Elk River to determine if any chemicals are released into the air as the site is cleaned up.

The Charleston Gazette reports that the program's debut comes three weeks after the removal of more than one dozen chemical storage tanks.

epa.gov

  Twelve state attorneys general are urging an appeals court to decide quickly on a lawsuit over the legality of proposed carbon emission standards.

West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey and Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway announced the motion Wednesday at a news conference in Ashland, Kentucky.

Wednesday's filing in U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia asks for a quicker timeline on a lawsuit saying the federal standards should be thrown out.

epa.gov

  The federal Environmental Protection Agency is awarding $250,000 to renovate a contaminated site in the Eastern Panhandle.

The EPA announced the additional brownfields assistance for Charles Town on Friday. The money will fuel cleanup at the Public Works Yard site next to the brownfield restoration effort at the Supertane plant.

In 2012, EPA awarded a $650,000 revolving loan largely used for the Supertane site.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  Members of Congress, state government and industry representatives gathered in Bluefield Tuesday for the Bluefield Coal Symposium. The annual event gathers leaders to discuss the major issues facing the industry.

On the panel were Congressmen Nick Rahall and Morgan Griffith of Virginia, state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, West Virginia Coal Association President Bill Rainey and Alpha Natural Resources Senior Vice President of Environmental Affairs Gene Kitts. Sen. Joe Manchin served as the moderator.

Appalachian voices sound off at hearings about proposed EPA regulations:  “Our jobs our securities, for our families, I’m a recent retiree my benefits may be in jeopardy.”

But some residents are supporting new regulations: “We need to make it clear that the EPA does have the authority and the mandate and moral obligation to reign in CO 2 emissions.”

A Kentucky political tradition goes without a strong voice: “Darling if you want to use your outside voice you can go over there and play on the playground, OK. We’re trying to get some serious conversation going on so you can go over there play on the playground.”

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in is Pittsburgh for two days, holding a public hearing on climate change and proposed rules to reduce carbon emissions. As The Allegheny Front's Reid Frazier reports, the hearing proves the climate change debate is a divisive one in this region.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

 

  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is holding hearings in Pittsburgh on planned regulations to limit carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. Federal regulators are releasing new regulations to close loopholes in the mine inspection process. West Virginia lawmakers expalin why they decided to delay the implementation of a marina inspection law that could save lives and Mountain Stage's 800th show features Dave Mason and his hit "We Just Disagree."

Reid Frazier / The Allegheny Front

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency held hearings Thursday and Friday in Pittsburgh on a proposed rule to slash greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The plan is up against serious opposition from the coal industry, but environmental groups say it doesn’t go far enough.

Competing rallies for and against the EPA’s proposed carbon rules crossed paths in Downtown Pittsburgh today.

Marcus Constantino (@AMTino) / Charleston Daily Mail

   West Virginia officials joined hundreds of coal miners and coal supporters at an electricity and energy jobs rally.

The Wednesday event at Pittsburgh's Highmark Stadium included Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, Ohio Lt. Governor Mary Taylor, labor leaders and others.

Officials say the rally is aimed at raising awareness over proposed changed to federal rules about pollution discharged by coal-fired power plants.

epa.gov

A federal appeals court is declining to stand in the way of the Obama administration's efforts to block water pollution from mountaintop removal coal mining.

A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia issued the ruling Friday, according to The Charleston Gazette.

It concluded that the Environmental Protection Agency was within its authority to consult with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers about Clean Water Act permits for mining operations.

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