Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in is Pittsburgh for two days, holding a public hearing on climate change and proposed rules to reduce carbon emissions. As The Allegheny Front's Reid Frazier reports, the hearing proves the climate change debate is a divisive one in this region.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting


  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is holding hearings in Pittsburgh on planned regulations to limit carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. Federal regulators are releasing new regulations to close loopholes in the mine inspection process. West Virginia lawmakers expalin why they decided to delay the implementation of a marina inspection law that could save lives and Mountain Stage's 800th show features Dave Mason and his hit "We Just Disagree."

Reid Frazier / The Allegheny Front

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency held hearings Thursday and Friday in Pittsburgh on a proposed rule to slash greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The plan is up against serious opposition from the coal industry, but environmental groups say it doesn’t go far enough.

Competing rallies for and against the EPA’s proposed carbon rules crossed paths in Downtown Pittsburgh today.

Marcus Constantino (@AMTino) / Charleston Daily Mail

   West Virginia officials joined hundreds of coal miners and coal supporters at an electricity and energy jobs rally.

The Wednesday event at Pittsburgh's Highmark Stadium included Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, Ohio Lt. Governor Mary Taylor, labor leaders and others.

Officials say the rally is aimed at raising awareness over proposed changed to federal rules about pollution discharged by coal-fired power plants.


A federal appeals court is declining to stand in the way of the Obama administration's efforts to block water pollution from mountaintop removal coal mining.

A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia issued the ruling Friday, according to The Charleston Gazette.

It concluded that the Environmental Protection Agency was within its authority to consult with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers about Clean Water Act permits for mining operations.

  U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin is encouraging West Virginia residents to speak out on new pollution limits.

Manchin is directing state residents to the Federal Register to voice their concerns regarding the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed limits on carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants. The Federal Register serves as a federal portal where all Americans can voice their comments before any federal government agency's proposed rule can be implemented.

Bernard Pollack/(aflcio)

The United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) is planning to make its objections to proposed EPA rules loud and clear. The union has a rally scheduled at the end of the month in Pittsburgh.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Together, Harvard and Syracuse Universities have released a study that maps potential air quality benefits based on the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed carbon dioxide emissions reductions revealed this month. WVU’s Center for Energy and Sustainable Development is working with Downstream Strategies on a new report to advise policy makers as they draft strategies to submit to the EPA. Also, A Brooklyn-based theater company will bring a play to Charleston in response to the Elk River Chemical Spill. 

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

West Virginia University’s Center for Energy and Sustainable Development is working with Downstream Strategies on a new report, analyzing how West Virginia can best meet new Enivronmental Protection Agency proposals on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. This study will be used to advise policy makers as they draft strategies to submit to the EPA.

Janet Kunicki / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey says federal regulators don't have authority to implement a wide-reaching scale-back on carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.

The Republican made the assertion in a Friday letter to Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy.

Since coal plants are covered elsewhere in the Clean Air Act, Morrisey says EPA can't further regulate them.

Morrisey says EPA relies on a technical error made when Congress amended the act in 1990.

Wikipedia Image

Mike Duncan is the President and CEO of the American Coalition for Clean Coal and Electricity. He’s disappointed in these proposals on carbon emission cuts, which call for 30 percent in carbon reductions from 2005 levels, by 2030. Duncan says his organization hopes to work with states on a continual basis to come up with solutions.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

After the EPA announced its Clean Power Plan Monday--aiming to reduce carbon emissions by 30 percent by 2030 based on figures from 2005--we bring reaction from lawmakers, the coal industry, unions, and environmentalists. 

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency unveiling proposed rules aimed to reduce carbon emissions by 2030, many questions remain about the impact on West Virginia's economy. State officials, union and industry leaders, and environmentalists are all weighing in on the potential impacts of the proposed rules. 

Reducing carbon emissions in West Virginia to meet the EPA's proposed rules will no doubt hinge on the future use of coal, as well as increasing energy use from other sources. 

Twiter / @hansenevan

  After months of speculation, the Environmental Protection Agency finally released its new proposals on existing coal fire power plants today. The EPA wants to cut carbon dioxide emissions from these facilities by up to 30 percent in the next 15 years. This strategy means these plants will be doing  business differently.


Evan Hansen with Downstream Strategies, an environmental consulting firm in Morgantown  says West Virginia needs to get on board with a plan to cut the pollution from power plants in the state  by 20 percent by the year 2030 using new and developing technology.


The Trust for America’s Health, a non-profit, non-partisan organization in Washington D.C. working to make disease prevention a national priority, likes the EPA’s new carbon emissions rules.

On Monday, the Environmental Protection Agency released a plan to cut carbon pollution by 30 percent from coal-fired power plants by the year 2030. The plan comes as a result of executive actions from President Barack Obama to fight climate change. 


Federal environmental regulators have picked five West Virginia projects to receive $1 million in brownfields grants.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  Lawmakers decide to take more time to review bills, as they get called in for a special session. The Environmental Protection Agency's new regulations on carbon emissions from coal fired power plants will be released next week, leaving concerns for many in the industry. Also, a couple from Elkins who specialize in oral histories are taking a look at all sides of fracking. 

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

The Environmental Protection Agency is going to be releasing new rules on carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants in the next few weeks. It’s an issue of great concern for many who rely on coal for work. But some also see it as an opportunity.

About 84 percent of the nation’s total greenhouse gas emissions into Earth’s atmosphere are from carbon dioxide, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, and much of that carbon dioxide comes from burning fossil fuels like coal. The EPA is taking action as, under the Clean Air Act, to enforce cuts in carbon emissions for cleaner air.

natural gas, fracking

  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is seeking public comment on ways to disclose information about the chemicals used in the oil and gas drilling process known as fracking.

The EPA says in a Friday release that it is also seeking input on incentives and programs that could help develop safer fracking chemicals.