Environmental Protection Agency

Bernard Pollack/(aflcio)

The United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) is planning to make its objections to proposed EPA rules loud and clear. The union has a rally scheduled at the end of the month in Pittsburgh.


Together, Harvard and Syracuse Universities have released a study that maps potential air quality benefits based on the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed carbon dioxide emissions reductions revealed this month. WVU’s Center for Energy and Sustainable Development is working with Downstream Strategies on a new report to advise policy makers as they draft strategies to submit to the EPA. Also, A Brooklyn-based theater company will bring a play to Charleston in response to the Elk River Chemical Spill. 

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

West Virginia University’s Center for Energy and Sustainable Development is working with Downstream Strategies on a new report, analyzing how West Virginia can best meet new Enivronmental Protection Agency proposals on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. This study will be used to advise policy makers as they draft strategies to submit to the EPA.

Janet Kunicki / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey says federal regulators don't have authority to implement a wide-reaching scale-back on carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.

The Republican made the assertion in a Friday letter to Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy.

Since coal plants are covered elsewhere in the Clean Air Act, Morrisey says EPA can't further regulate them.

Morrisey says EPA relies on a technical error made when Congress amended the act in 1990.

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Mike Duncan is the President and CEO of the American Coalition for Clean Coal and Electricity. He’s disappointed in these proposals on carbon emission cuts, which call for 30 percent in carbon reductions from 2005 levels, by 2030. Duncan says his organization hopes to work with states on a continual basis to come up with solutions.

After the EPA announced its Clean Power Plan Monday--aiming to reduce carbon emissions by 30 percent by 2030 based on figures from 2005--we bring reaction from lawmakers, the coal industry, unions, and environmentalists. 

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency unveiling proposed rules aimed to reduce carbon emissions by 2030, many questions remain about the impact on West Virginia's economy. State officials, union and industry leaders, and environmentalists are all weighing in on the potential impacts of the proposed rules. 

Reducing carbon emissions in West Virginia to meet the EPA's proposed rules will no doubt hinge on the future use of coal, as well as increasing energy use from other sources. 

Twiter / @hansenevan

  After months of speculation, the Environmental Protection Agency finally released its new proposals on existing coal fire power plants today. The EPA wants to cut carbon dioxide emissions from these facilities by up to 30 percent in the next 15 years. This strategy means these plants will be doing  business differently.

 

Evan Hansen with Downstream Strategies, an environmental consulting firm in Morgantown  says West Virginia needs to get on board with a plan to cut the pollution from power plants in the state  by 20 percent by the year 2030 using new and developing technology.

healthyamericans.org

The Trust for America’s Health, a non-profit, non-partisan organization in Washington D.C. working to make disease prevention a national priority, likes the EPA’s new carbon emissions rules.

On Monday, the Environmental Protection Agency released a plan to cut carbon pollution by 30 percent from coal-fired power plants by the year 2030. The plan comes as a result of executive actions from President Barack Obama to fight climate change. 

epa.gov

Federal environmental regulators have picked five West Virginia projects to receive $1 million in brownfields grants.

  Lawmakers decide to take more time to review bills, as they get called in for a special session. The Environmental Protection Agency's new regulations on carbon emissions from coal fired power plants will be released next week, leaving concerns for many in the industry. Also, a couple from Elkins who specialize in oral histories are taking a look at all sides of fracking. 

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

The Environmental Protection Agency is going to be releasing new rules on carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants in the next few weeks. It’s an issue of great concern for many who rely on coal for work. But some also see it as an opportunity.

About 84 percent of the nation’s total greenhouse gas emissions into Earth’s atmosphere are from carbon dioxide, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, and much of that carbon dioxide comes from burning fossil fuels like coal. The EPA is taking action as, under the Clean Air Act, to enforce cuts in carbon emissions for cleaner air.

natural gas, fracking
wikimedia

  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is seeking public comment on ways to disclose information about the chemicals used in the oil and gas drilling process known as fracking.

The EPA says in a Friday release that it is also seeking input on incentives and programs that could help develop safer fracking chemicals.

Janet Kunicki / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

  West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey is asking federal officials to delay regulations for existing power plants.  Morrisey says he sent a letter today to the Environmental Protection Agency regarding plans to establish carbon dioxide emission regulations for existing power plants.

Freedom Industries
AP

  Months after a chemical spilled into 300,000 West Virginians' water source, federal officials want to determine at what level people can safely breathe the chemical's fumes.

Over the next few months, the Environmental Protection Agency will work on detecting crude MCHM in the air and creating a safety standard for inhaling it.

Is the Water Safe Yet?

Mar 31, 2014

In this piece from The Atlantic, Marin Cogan details how little was (and still is) known about MCHM, the chemical spilled into the Elk River by Freedom Industries on January 9 and affected the drinking water of West Virginians across nine counties. The story also highlights failures in policy--from state and federal agencies--such as the Department of Environmental Protection, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

A feature article in April’s edition of National Geographic Magazine examines what America and other key countries are doing to limit carbon dioxide emissions.

The article comes as new regulations from the Obama Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency are up for public comment. 

The article assumes that humans are inducing global climate change, an idea that some Republicans as well as the West Virginia Coal Association, still question. 

Wacky Weather

AllVoices.com

An Ohio-based coal operator is suing the head of the Environmental Protection Agency over the agency's administration and enforcement of the Clean Air Act.
 
Murray Energy alleges in its lawsuit that EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy has failed to comply with the law's requirement to evaluate the potential impact of the agency's regulatory actions on employment.
 

The House passes a bill known as the Pregnant Workers' Fairness Act--but not without fierce debate over an amendment that sought to include "fetus" in the bill's language, The Joint Legislative Oversight Commission on State Water Resources hears from Kanawha-Charleston Health Depart chief Dr. Rahul Gupta and the state Bureau for Public Health's Dr. Letitia Tierney. Also, Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin provides an update on the chemical spill and water crisis with officials from the CDC and EPA.

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