Energy & Environment

Freedom Industries
AP

The company at the center of West Virginia's chemical spill paid about $6 million to executives and associated companies the year before its bankruptcy declaration.
 
Court documents show $1.1 million went to three former Freedom Industries owners. Two left Freedom after a Dec. 6 merger deal worth $15 million.
 

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

Federal health experts say they'll talk with West Virginia officials about what lab studies are needed on little-known chemicals that spilled into a water system last month.
 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention spokeswoman Bernadette Burden said Wednesday the CDC will reach out to the state about possibly conducting more studies.
 

State regulators say tests indicate water quality hasn't changed following a coal slurry spill in a Kanawha River tributary.
 
The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission tested water samples Saturday through Tuesday at Huntington's water intake on the Ohio River. The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection says the results indicate no water quality changes.
 

WCHS

Charleston Mayor Danny Jones is exploring the city taking on testing of hotels and homes, to "prove to folks that the water is okay if, in fact, it is."

Jones said he doesn't know how many samples would be collected because he is awaiting a report from an Ohio-based company that would outline the cost of testing. He didn't reveal the name of the company. 

Freedom Industries
Aaron Payne / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia company involved in last month's chemical spill is heading back to bankruptcy court.
 
Freedom Industries will return to the Robert C. Byrd Federal Courthouse for a 10 a.m. hearing Friday. The company wants to hire experts and environmental consultants to assess the circumstances surrounding its Jan. 9 spill.

Department of Environmental Protection, DEP
Department of Environmental Protection

West Virginia regulators say a coal operator can begin testing new control measures at the site of a slurry spill.
 
The Department of Environmental Protection said Wednesday that it has modified an order halting all work at Patriot Coal's Kanawha Eagle preparation plant in Winifrede.
 

Chuck Roberts / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin and Department of Health and Human Resources Secretary Karen Bowling Tuesday sent a letter to Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to formally request the CDC, or its partners, immediately conduct further epidemiological and/or toxicological studies and address ongoing population surveillance or monitoring as a result of the January 9 Elk River chemical spill.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin says he's not sure about tapping state reserves to monitor people's long-term health after chemicals spilled into their water supply last month.
 
Senate Majority Leader John Unger has said Tomblin should use $10 million from the state's rainy day fund for 10 years of health monitoring. Unger said lawmakers could approve the money, but it'd be easier with Tomblin's support.
 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the State Senate goes through a very spirited debate on a prescriptions bill.

Also, the House of Delegates looks at allowing alcohol sales earlier in the day on Sunday, despite some opposition in the House.

A public hearing held by the House Judiciary Committee gives those concerned over frack waste a chance to weigh in.

The House Judiciary Committee heard thoughts and concerns during a public hearing over a piece of pending legislation: HB4411 - allowing the disposal of drill cuttings and associated drilling waste generated from fracking sites in commercial solid waste facilities.

Some History:

Some Recent History:

State-Wide Concern:

Some Science:

The Advocate:

Kanawha County
wikimedia / Wikimedia

Kanawha County and City of Charleston  have announces Bulk Water Sites for Tuesday, February 18th through Sunday, February 23rd.
 
Bring Your Own Containers To:
 
Crossing Mall – Elkview
Walmart Parking Lot – Quincy
Shawnee Park – Institute
Old Big Sandy Parking Lot – Cross Lanes
Big Lots Parking Lot –Patrick Street – Charleston
100 Maywood Avenue-Across from Post Office – Clendenin
 
 

KDKA TV- Pittsburgh / KDKA

A natural gas well fire in Greene County, Pa., is out after it burned for several days.

A stream that meanders along the West Virginia-Pennsylvania border is being used to help keep the site restored, as order is slowly coming back to the location.

Dunkard Creek is the stream being used to withdraw water as the site is being worked on.

Kanawha Co. Schools

Concerns over the water in West Virginia persist 39 days after a coal scrubbing chemical spill affected the water supply of some 300,000 residents across nine counties. One school in Kanawha Co. dismissed early  Monday.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, an underground injection well in Fayette County clears a key regulatory hurdle with the Department of Environmental Protection.

A study looks at how businesses were affected by the Elk River Chemical Spill, and more!

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The water has been contaminated for residents in nine counties. At a congressional hearing in West Virginia, their representatives demanded the answer to that simple question we asked earlier: Is the water safe?

Here's Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito questioning the state's commissioner of public health, Letitia Tierney.

REPRESENTATIVE SHELLEY MOORE CAPITO: Dr. Tierney, is the water safe to drink?

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

There are some basic things we take for granted, at least in the developed world, that the air we breathe or the water that flows into our homes won't make us sick. So imagine you turn on your local TV news to this.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS REPORT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: State of emergency in several counties tonight after a chemical spills into the water supply. Good evening. I'm...

A new report says West Virginia can do more with solar power.

Sen. Jay Rockefeller expresses his opinion about the West Virginia water crisis.

A Marshall University student is watching the winter Olympics with extra special interest.

And for Jessica Lilly all this snow is a slippery slope.

WV PBS/RMazza

Frustration and anger continue to mount in the affected counties of last month’s chemical spill.

West Virginians are getting schooled in chemistry and biology, and are suddenly intimately involved in considering the bigger picture of environmental regulations on industrial activities.

Three experts, one on water quality, one on environmental law, and one on public health, spoke on the West Virginia Public Broadcasting's The Law Works about these issues.

WV Legislature

A top state senator wants West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin to use $10 million in reserves for health monitoring after chemicals spilled into 300,000 people's water supply.
 
     Senate Majority John Unger wants the governor to tap into the state's rainy day fund for the program. The last-resort fund of about $915 million is considered one of the nation's strongest.
 

Jessica Lilly / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection has renewed a permit for an underground injection well in Fayette County that accepts fracking water and other waste.

A public hearing in 2013 brought concerned residents and former workers of Danny Webb Construction, the owner of the site. Residents have been concerned about the site for years.

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