Elaine McMillion Sheldon

Benny Becker/ WMMT

Too many times, when stories of Appalachia are in the national spotlight, we hear shallow, shocking and grim stories. But they miss some of the most inspiring aspects to our realities: the struggle, the perseverance and the resilience.  On this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia we’ll meet storytellers who work to help Appalachians tell their own stories, and capture the true Appalachian spirit behind the statistics.

Courtesy of Netflix / by Rebecca Kiger

As most know, the heroin and opioid crisis has reached stunning and heartbreaking heights across the nation. Huntington, West Virginia’s drug overdose death rate sits at ten times the national average.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the heroin and opioid crisis has reached stunning and heartbreaking heights across the nation...and Huntington, West Virginia’s drug overdose death rate sits at ten times the national average. A new film is out today that documents the severity of the problem – but also shines a light on the tireless work of three women trying to fight against a wave of desperation in their hometown. Produced in part by the Center for Investigative Reporting, Heroin(e) premieres today on Netflix. Dave Mistich spoke with film maker Elaine McMillion Sheldon about her film and what it’s like to document something that has affected so many of us in one way or another.

Christine Cover

Appalachia has certainly been stereotyped by many people in the media. But not all storytellers are the same, and the stories that are told about Appalachia are often complicated with layers of misunderstandings. 

It takes time, compassion and perhaps an inside perspective to delve deep and do justice to the people affected by the story. So much of this type of work- that which is reshaping how Appalachia is portrayed- is being rendered by women in the media.

Christine Cover

Appalachia has certainly been stereotyped by many people in the media. But not all storytellers are the same, and the stories that are told about Appalachia are often complicated with layers of misunderstandings. 

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Those attending the screening at the United States Capitol Tuesday evening will not only learn more about West Virginia, but will be able to sample some of its culinary treats. On Monday the Shepherdstown Sweet Shop Bakery was assembling this edible mosaic of the West Virginia state seal for the event. Owner Pam Berry said each square in the design was attached to the top of a chocolate brownie piece, making about 370 petit fours, or bite size treats.