Education

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, after meetings Tuesday with Gov. Jim Justice, leaders of teacher and service personnel unions say the work stoppage will end Thursday. Dave Mistich reports on how the news was delivered and reaction from lawmakers.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In this episode of West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear from union leaders and also from students who are finding ways to speak up about the teachers’ strike. 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we have the latest from the Capitol on the ongoing teacher walk-out and protest at in Charleston. With the continued approach of county school officials remaining in question, the potential of legal action to be decided by the state board of education and legislative deadlines looming, educators and school workers yet again plan to head to the Capitol in Charleston to rally lawmakers for better pay and health care benefits.

On The Legislature Today, teachers, school service personnel and other public employees returned for the second of a two-day work stoppage as frustrations linger over salaries and healthcare. Leaders of the American Federation of Teachers, West Virginia and the West Virginia Education Association announced Friday that the work stoppage will continue Monday. But will it be just that -- a work stoppage -- or a full-on strike? Here’s the latest from the statehouse in this week’s reporter roundtable.

Gloria Triplett, a reading specialist at East Chapmanville Elementary School, holds signs Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, during a teacher rally at the West Virginia Capitol in Charleston, W.Va.
John Raby / Associated Press

West Virginia teachers will continue their strike into next week, the latest response to what’s quickly becoming a deepening rift with the governor and Legislature over pay and health benefits.

Thousands of teachers and school service workers in all 55 counties will remain off the job Monday, union leaders announced at a news conference Friday afternoon.

Acts of violence and protests resisting racial integration were features in many American communities in the 1950s and 60s. A tiny town in the coalfields of South Central West Virginia appears to have been a notable exception.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, all 55 West Virginia county school systems were closed yesterday and continue to be closed today, because of a two-day work stoppage over teacher salaries and Public Employee Insurance Agency costs. Reporter Dave Mistich breaks all the issues down for us.

West Virginia's public schools were closed Thursday, as teachers across the state walked out and protested for better pay and benefits from state lawmakers.

Gov. Jim Justice signed a bill Wednesday to give teachers a 2 percent pay raise starting in July, and an additional 1 percent pay increase in 2020 and 2021.

Kristian Thacker

The West Virginia House of Delegates has approved a plan to use part of yearly budget surpluses to help fund public employee health insurance.

The bill comes as thousands of teachers, school service personnel and other public employees took to the Capitol Thursday, Feb. 22, to rally lawmakers for better pay and an overhaul of their insurance plan. Schools in all 55 of West Virginia’s counties were closed Thursday because of the work stoppage. A second day of walkouts is planned for Friday.

Nicole Erwin

In the wake of school shootings in Kentucky and Florida, a rash of copycat school threats throughout the Ohio Valley left law enforcement and school officials grappling with how to improve security. A school counseling expert says it’s useful to look at the potential school shootings that did not happen. His research focuses on how schools have successfully averted shooting incidents.

Culture of Dignity

On The Legislature Today, the looming statewide teacher work stoppage is scheduled for later this week, and there are several related issues before the Finance and Education Committees. Host Andrea Lannom chats with Del. Paul Espinosa, R-Jefferson, Chairman of the House Education Committee and member of the House Finance committee. Also joining the conversation is Del. Larry Rowe, D-Kanawha, member of both the House Education and Finance Committees.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On today's West Virginia Morning, a statewide walkout has been announced for teachers and other state employees for Thursday and Friday this week. As Liz McCormick reports, the announcement was made during Saturday's rally at the state Capitol, in Charleston.

Concord University's Marsh Hall Bell Tower.
Christopher Ziemnowicz / CZmarlin / wikimedia Commons

A recent report ranks one university in West Virginia among the top 50 public colleges where undergrads receive the most scholarship aid.

According to a study released by The Student Loan Report, a limited liability private company, Concord is ranked 49th out of 250 public college of universities.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, The West Virginia House of Delegates passed a salary increase for teachers, school service personnel and state troopers Tuesday. The passage of the bill comes as two of the state’s teacher unions have threatened to strike amid growing frustrations over salaries, problems with the state’s insurance provider and teacher vacancies. Dave Mistich has the story.

On The Legislature Today, hundreds of teachers rallied at the Capitol. Teachers from selected counties staged walk-in's and walk-outs, and Governor Jim Justice cancelled a scheduled press conference where it was planned he would talk about education issues. Host Andrea Lannom chats with fellow statehouse reporters Brad McElhinny of West Virginia MetroNews and Ryan Quinn of the Charleston Gazette-Mail in another reporter roundtable.

Gloria Triplett, a reading specialist at East Chapmanville Elementary School, holds signs Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, during a teacher rally at the West Virginia Capitol in Charleston, W.Va.
John Raby / Associated Press

Before a gallery packed with teachers, West Virginia's Senate approved a bill Friday to give them annual pay raises of 1 percent over a four-year period, a move that both teachers and many senators said wasn't enough.

The bill passed on a 33-0 vote after a lengthy discussion. One senator was absent.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, during the course of the past week, teacher rallies have sprung up around the state, as the West Virginia Education Association and the American Federation for Teachers continue discussions with members about possible strikes or walkouts.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Over the course of the week, teacher rallies have sprung up around the state, as the West Virginia Education Association and the state chapter of the American Federation for Teachers continue discussions with members about possible strikes or walkouts. While increases to PEIA premiums and deductibles are some elements feeding those talks, teacher pay has been another flash point.

In Wake Of School Shooting, A Look At How Kids Get Guns

Jan 25, 2018
Heather Adams and Gloria Hollifield waiting to pick up their children after the shooting.  There is another parallel to the Marshall County High shooting.
Nicole Erwin / Ohio Valley ReSource

Heather Adams sat in a line of cars along Kentucky Route 95, cars filled with parents who had just received the call no parent wants to get: A shooting at her child’s school, Marshall County High in Benton, Kentucky. Two 15-year-old students were killed and another 18 injured.  


On The Legislature Today, education bills are making their way through committees. Host Andrea Lannom asks House Education Chairman Del. Paul Espinosa to outline some of that legislation as well as touch on issues that might come up at the statehouse this year.

Electron / Wikimedia Commons

The West Virginia Board of Education has agreed to reduce the credits required to graduate from the state's high schools from 24 to 22, allowing two fewer elective classes.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that change will apply in the next school year.

This week on Inside Appalachia: wildlife experts agree the Eastern Mountain Lion is extinct. So why do so many people across Appalachia swear they’ve seen mountain lions? Have they? What did they really see? WMRA’s Andrew Jenner and Brent Finnegan explored the stories behind mountain lion sightings in the mountains of central Appalachia. What they found, made them question the expert opinion.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

One of our favorite stories from 2017 comes from Glynis Board who investigated how communities across the region and the country are investing in compassion to improve economy. Sounds a little farfetched. But a growing body of science points to compassion as an economic driver. Glynis explains why many businesses and cities are buying into the idea. 


The rise of entrepreneurship in West Virginia is one of the top 5 trends shaping our state in 2018.  

West Virginia School Building Authority

The West Virginia School Building Authority has voted to fund $59.1 million in facilities projects statewide.

Monday's vote includes construction and renovation projects for public school systems in 22 counties. The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports $49.2 million comes from this year's "needs" grant funding cycle and $9.9 million is from next year's cycle.

Benny Becker / Ohio Valley Resource

The sound of power tools blends with teenage chatter as students clamber around, under, and over a trailer bed that they’re busy turning into a home. They’re part of a project called “Building It Forward,” which has vocational classes building tiny houses as a way of gaining practical skills and new confidence.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as coal country looks for a new path forward, some communities are looking to their public schools. Many are changing not just how they prepare students but how they can help meet economic and social challenges.

Changing Course: A School Cooperative Aims To Remake Coal Communities

Nov 27, 2017
Benny Becker / Ohio Valley Resource

Betsy Layne High School serves rural Floyd County in the eastern Kentucky town of Stanville, population 206. Students there produce a video program called “Bobcat Banter” where they usually talk about sports and student life. But early last year “Bobcat Banter” introduced some special guests.

“We’re here with Mr. and Mrs. Gates from the Gates Foundation,” the students said.

The world’s richest man and his partner in life and philanthropy, Melinda Gates, had dropped in for a chat.

 

African-American educator William H. Davis was born in Columbus, Ohio, on November 27, 1848. As a young man of 15, he enlisted in the Union Army and served in a Light Guard company that helped protect President Abraham Lincoln.

A bond that would build a new school has been rejected for the second time this year by voters in West Virginia.

The Bluefield Daily Telegraph reports Monroe County voters rejected the $5.8 million bond with Saturday's unofficial total of 1,223 to 877. The bond would've helped build a new school for Peterstown elementary and middle school students.

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