Donald Trump

Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

At the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Clinic in Scarbro, oxygen tubes dangle from the noses of three miners slowly pedaling on stationary bikes.  All of these men have black lung – a disease caused by breathing in coal dust. Over time, the dust coats the lungs and causes them to harden. Hard lungs don’t easily expand and contract, and that makes it difficult to breath.

Nancy Andrews / West Virginia University

It's clear many of the adults living in Appalachia are focused on what the new president can do for the economy here, but they're not alone. Young people also have their own concerns about Trump.

Students from Frankfort High School in Mineral County marched in the inaugural parade Friday in Washington, but before they left, they shared their thoughts about President Trump and their role in performing at his inauguration.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, voters in Pennsylvania’s coal country are looking to President Donald Trump to promote the industry and members of the Frankfort High School band are getting ready to march in today’s inaugural parade in Washington. 

That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

PBS NewsHour

On Friday Jan. 20, West Virginia Public Broadcasting will offer special coverage of all the events surrounding the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump including the parade, Trump's speech, the oath of office, the counter protests and the Inaugural balls – complete with insights and analysis from reporters in the field.

Aaron Schackelford / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The billionaire Wilbur Ross is headed for Senate confirmation hearings as President-elect Donald Trump’s choice for Secretary of Commerce. Ross made it to ultra-rich status in part by salvaging coal and steel assets in Appalachia and the Rust Belt. His business dealings leave a mixed legacy in the Ohio Valley region, from rescued steel mills to the site of a searing workplace disaster, and raise questions about the leadership he would bring to the president’s cabinet.  

 

U.S. National Archive Jack Corn

Why is Donald Trump so popular in Appalachia? And how confident are Appalachians that Trump will change the economy and bring back thousands of coal mining jobs?

What do Donald Trump, goat yoga and West Virginia's budget have in common? Find out on this week's Front Porch podcast.

Jim Justice Victory Speech
Walter Scriptunas II / AP

Some of the conflict-of-interest issues swirling around President-elect Donald Trump in Washington are playing out on a smaller scale in West Virginia, where the richest man in the state — an Appalachian coal baron with real estate, resort and farm holdings, too — is about to be sworn in as governor.

Democratic Gov.-elect Jim Justice, like Trump, has refused to shed his holdings, giving assurances he can be trusted to act honorably. Like Trump, he has put his business empire in the hands of family members, though he said as recently as last month that he would put his holdings in a blind trust.

Anne Li / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Appalachia voted overwhelmingly for Donald Trump. He won 95% of the counties here. On this week’s Inside Appalachia, we speak with Trump supporters and opponents about how a Trump presidency will impact our region.

Nam Y. Huh/AP

West Virginia Public Broadcasting (WVPB) will provide extensive coverage of President-Elect Donald Trump's press conference on our statewide radio networks and online and wvpublic.org. Coverage begins Wednesday, January 11 at 11 a.m. EST.

Steve Helber / Associated Press

During his campaign, president-elect Donald Trump promised to repeal the Affordable Care Act – a move many West Virginians say they support after facing rising premiums and deductibles.  But a repeal without a replacement plan could be disastrous for the millions of Americans who have gained health insurance under the law, including 173,000 West Virginians newly covered under Medicaid expansion and 37,000 who have bought private insurance plans through the Marketplace. And Republicans have yet to release a replacement plan.

 

 

Donald Trump
Darron Cummings / Associated Press

Three West Virginia representatives to the electoral college are clear and unequivocal that they will be voting for Donald Trump to be the next U.S. president regardless of emails, letters and calls urging them not to.

The state's five electoral college representatives were all chosen earlier this year by West Virginia's Republican Party. They got the nod after their party's candidate won a majority of the state's popular vote.

Donald Trump
Darron Cummings / Associated Press

What were the top stories in West Virginia from 2016? We searched our archives from the past year and compiled this list of the most popular stories.

Us & Them

"I think the only way to have useful conversations across these intense differences is to be able to just tolerate the other person’s position, but not have an agenda about changing them."

Updated at 1:49 p.m. ET Saturday with confirmation from the U.S. official and comments from Sen. Ron Wyden

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET Saturday with comments from Sen. Angus King

The CIA has concluded that Russia intervened in the 2016 election specifically to help Donald Trump win the presidency, a U.S. official has confirmed to NPR.

Steve Helber / AP Photo

A higher percentage of voters supported Donald Trump in West Virginia than in any other state, according to the Cook Political Report’s 2016 National Popular Vote Tracker

Two of every three West Virginia voters chose Trump – 68.6 percent. That narrowly beats out the next pro-Trump states: Wyoming (68.2 percent), Oklahoma (65.3 percent), North Dakota (63.0 percent) and Kentucky (62.5 percent).

UC Hastings

How could a billionaire born into wealth become the champion of the white working class?

That question stumped a lot of liberal commentators, but Joan Williams wasn’t surprised.

Williams studies the white working class and is founding director of the Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings College of the Law.

This week Scott, Laurie, and Rick are joined by guest Sharif Youssef. Youssef is the child of an Egyptian immigrant who grew up in the town of West Liberty, West Virginia, who now works as a producer on the popular podcast "99% Invisible" in the San Francisco Bay area.

Doctor Patient Health Care Coverage
Fæ / wikimedia commons

Federal health Secretary Sylvia Burwell plans to join a discussion in her native West Virginia on the federal health law that expanded insurance coverage to 165,000 residents.

The Affordable Care Act is a signature Obama administration initiative that president-elect Donald Trump has vowed to at least partly roll back.

Jim Justice
Chris Tilley / AP Photo

West Virginia's incoming Democratic governor says he received a weekend phone call from Republican President-elect Donald to discuss how to revive the slumping coal industry.

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