Climate Change

Logo courtesy of Mark Lerner

Us & Them host Trey Kay tackles two big issues on the latest episode of the podcast this week: evolution and climate change. And while those issues are obviously divisive, Trey explores a new twist in the battle over these topics.

There are those out there willing to give thousands of dollars to anyone able to disprove their theories. 

Trey spoke with Beth Vorhees about the new episode and how money gets involved in the debates over these topics.

For this show, I speak with two men with very different perspectives on science.  They feel so strongly about their opinions that they are willing to put their money where their mouths are.   They each are offering a cash prize to anyone who can disprove their scientific theory.

On West Virginia Morning, Us & Them host Trey Kay talks with Beth Vorhees about his latest podcast concerning evolution and climate change.  That’s on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Radio news – telling West Virginia’s story.


Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Student Climate & Conservation Congress met for its sixth year this week in Shepherdstown, teaching high school students about conservation and leadership skills.

Atlanta Journal Constitution, John Harmon, October 1997

This week, we remember Jean Ritchie, who's been called the mother of Appalachian folk music.

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports from the state capitol where lawmakers held the first meeting of a special committee on tax reform.  And Clark Davis talks with the first American survivor of the Ebola virus.  These stories on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Board of Education voted 6-2 Thursday to adopt an amended set of science standards for West Virginia schools. The amendments came at the request of Board member and previous Board President Wade Linger.

On West Virginia Morning, we’ll have a report from a hearing conducted by U.S. Senator Shelley Moore Capito yesterday in Beckley about how the EPA’s emission control plan will affect southern West Virginia. 


On West Virginia Morning, Glynis Board reports on a congressional rewrite of the Toxic Substances Control Act.  The state’s two U.S. Senators are sponsors.  And we’ll travel to Pickens in Randolph County to visit with a maple syrup farmer.  These stories coming up on West Virginia Morning from West Virginia Public Broadcasting – telling West Virginia’s story.


Roxy Todd

In colder regions of Appalachia, the third week in March is maple syrup season. That’s right, maple syrup isn’t just for New England farmers. This weekend marks the 31st annual maple syrup festival in Pickens, West Virginia.

Roxy Todd

During January’s West Virginia Board of Education meeting, the Board voted to withdraw a controversial new policy that addresses how science teachers should teach climate change to public school students.

Folks have until 4:00 pm Tuesday February 17th, to weigh in on this new policy.

  “Climate Change and Population Health” was the title of a recent discussion at West Virginia University. Three panelists, a social scientist, an entomologist, and a public health expert turned over research and health concerns related to that research on climate change - or as the discussion moderator, Interim Chair of the Department of Health Policy, Management, and Leadership in the WVU School of Public Health, Robert Duval, was more apt to call it: Climate Disruption.


Ashton Marra/ WVPB

The West Virginia Board of Education rescinded a proposal on Wednesday on teaching requirements for education science standards on climate change.

Over a hundred people flooded the board room at the state capitol, many of them because of a controversial addition to the science curriculum for k-12 grade students.

Recognizing their concerns, the board voted to place the proposal back on a 30-day public comment period.

The vote came at the suggestion of Clayton Burch, the Department of Education's chief academic officer. “It's important to get it right.”

One this episode of West Virginia Morning, Governor Tomblin emphasized reaching across the aisle and moving the state forward last night during his state of the state address. And we continue our series on water quality.

  The West Virginia Board of Education has rescinded a proposal on teaching requirements for education science standards on climate change.

The board voted Wednesday to place the proposal back on a 30-day public comment period.

The vote came at the suggestion of Clayton Burch, the Department of Education's chief academic officer. He suggested removing the proposal will ensure that the time is taken to "get it right."

We’ll hear some of the Christmas messages that were broadcasted into high security prisons this week on the Calls from Home radio program. The holidays often bring back memories of years past, and this is especially hard for those with a family member or loved one who’s passed away. And we’ll hear about a former marine in West Virginia who’s now helping people pull themselves out of poverty. You’ll find these stories and more this week, Inside Appalachia.

It Just Needed A Little Love: An Ugly Spruce Ties A Town Together

http://www.snowridersinternational.org

As the ski season opens, more than 115 snow and mountain supporters across the country have signed letters in support of bold action by the Environmental Protection Agency to curb power plant emissions.

On West Virginia Morning, Ashton Marra reports from the Summit on Race Matters in Appalachia held yesterday in Charleston.  And on the heels of a new agreement between the United States and China to limit greenhouse gases, Glynis Board explores a new report about ways to reduce emissions in West Virginia. 

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin
Courtesy Photo

West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin is visiting the state of Rhode Island today.

On West Virginia Morning, a special facility that cares for drug addicted newborns finally opens in Huntington.  It had taken years to get the proper permits.  And we’ll go to the state biscuit bakeoff held during the Autumn Harvest Festival in Pocahontas County. 

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