Child Poverty

Bettman/Corbis / NPR

In this episode, we'll hear reactions to Obama's proposed tax credits and other funding for Appalachia. And we'll talk with documentary filmmaker John Nakashima, whose new film, "The First 1000 Days," explores the effects of poverty on young children.

 

We'll also take a look back at how the lessons from the War on Poverty could shine light on present day economic development efforts.

Producer John Nakashima sits down to discuss the making of The First 1,000 Days: Investing in WV Children When it Counts.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, citizens in Fayette County speak out against the Boy Scout Amendment that passed in November.  They tell lawmakers that they fear the amendment will have a negative economic impact for businesses in the county.  And children’s advocates reveal their legislative wish list at the state capitol yesterday.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

According the 2013 American Community Survey, one in three children in West Virginia under the age of 5 lives in poverty. It’s something the Our Children, Our Future Campaign to End Child Poverty in West Virginia is focused on. The group met at the state capitol yesterday to reveal the top ten priorities it will tackle during the 2015 Legislative Session.

1,000 Days
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Children's first three years, or roughly a thousand days, shape the rest of their lives.  It's the only time in their lives when their brains will develop so rapidly and be so moldable.  Between 80-85% of their brain architecture is formed, providing what they need later to do well in school, both cognitively and socially.  

 

Data Shows Rate of Child Poverty in W.Va. Growing

Sep 18, 2014
West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy

Data released Thursday by the U. S. Census Bureau shows the percentage of West Virginians living in poverty stayed consistent last year, but the number of children living below the poverty line has grown.

According to the 2013 American Community Survey, one in three children in West Virginia under the age of 5 lived in poverty in 2013.

Roxy Todd

The West Side in Charleston is one of the largest urban neighborhoods in the state. Within sight of the Mary C. Snow West Side Elementary School are vacant lots and abandoned buildings. This neighborhood is besieged with many problems like childhood poverty and high crime rates. It’s also a neighborhood that suffers from negative stereotyping—a place where good people and good projects are often overlooked.

Facebook.com

A group working to change policy in West Virginia to improve communities and end child poverty in the state is hoping to get input on how to do it, from residents. Organizers at the Our Children Our Future campaign are hosting four workshops this month.

The Our Children Our Future Campaign is conducting day long trainings in four separate towns across West Virginia. The group touches on issues like policy advocacy, healthy lifestyles, voter education, and more.


West Virginia Legislature

During the school year children are guaranteed at least one full meal a day, something that goes away during the summer months. Three churches in Jefferson County are teaming up with other organizations to offer lunch to children.

St. John Lutheran Church and St. John's Episcopal Church in Harpers Ferry and Bolivar United Methodist Church in Bolivar are teaming up with the Jefferson County Council on Aging to provide summer lunches and activities for children.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Child advocacy groups question Gov. Tomblin's budget prioroties. Our Story of the Jews radio series continues with Dr. Edith Levy, a survivor of the Holocaust who's lived in Morgantown since the 1950s, recalls her life and work in reminding people of the harsh realities of what happened.

Gov. Tomblin's office (@GovTomblin / Twitter)

Child abuse and poverty prevention advocates are questioning Governor Earl Ray Tomblin’s priorities.

Among the $67 million worth of cuts from the budget bill Thursday was about a $1 million reduction in funding for programs meant to prevent child abuse and child poverty.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, legislators debate details of pseudoephedrine, electric cigarettes, and child welfare. Plus, some radio sleigh riding, and this week's Mountain Stage Song of the Week: Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn with "City of Refuge."

The House of Delegates passes a bill to make the sale e-cigarettes illegal to minors and addresses the issue of sexual abuse of minors. The
Senate deals with two issues--state purchasing and pseudoephedrine--that have been in mind since interims. Representatives of the Our Children, Our Future campaign to end child poverty discuss their legislative priorities with Beth Vorhees.

The life expectancy for American females is 81 years.

In West Virginia, Marshall County has the longest life expectancy for women, with 80 years, while those in McDowell deal with about 6 years shorter life span.

The life expectancy for American males is about 76 years.

U.S. Navy

West Virginians remember where they were and what they were doing 50 years ago today--the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, residents in the Eastern Panhandle discuss issues related to child poverty, and Buddy & Julie Mille Miller perform "All My Tears" on this Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The forum started with opening remarks from State Sen. John Unger (D-Berkeley) and Del. Tiffany Lawrence (D-Jefferson). Participants then watched part of the PBS film Poor Kids and a short preview of a film about child poverty in the state being produced by West Virginia PBS.

They then met in smaller groups to talk about how poverty affects children academically and socially, stereotypes associated with being poor, what resources are available in the community and what can be done to prevent families from becoming poor.

This is National Homeless and Hunger Awareness Week, when the National Coalition for the Homeless and other advocacy organizations hope the country will focus on issues surrounding poverty. The United Way of the Eastern Panhandle is doing just that Thursday evening during a public forum.

During the forum "Poverty in the Panhandle: Children at Risk,"  the United Way of the Eastern Panhandle, Family Resource Network and Health and Human Services Collaborative hope to discuss the problem and come up with possible solutions.

Wheeling-based Crittenton Services began as a residential service for women, especially pregnant women, throughout the state.  Today it’s grown to serve women and families with behavioral challenges in a variety of ways. Recent research has been shedding new light on patterns of poverty and possible methods of breaking those cycles.

Crittenton Foundation

Crittenton Services has been serving women and children in West Virginia for over a century.  Over that time span they’ve collected some powerful insight into challenges the state faces regarding poverty, especially concerning women and children.

A History of Helping Women

It all started when a bout of Scarlet Fever killed a four-year-old little girl named Florence in 1882. Her father, Charles Crittenton, was devastated. A preacher in New York suggested that he deal with his grief by helping women of the streets.