Charleston

The U.S. Census Bureau says Charleston is hanging on as the only city in West Virginia with a population over 50,000, while Morgantown is now the state's third-largest city.

Census estimates released Thursday show Charleston had 50,404 residents in 2014. That's down about 1,000 from the 2010 Census.

Perry Bennett / WV Legislative Photography

Lawmakers met at the Capitol in Charleston Monday to show support for US Senator Shelley Moore Capito’s proposed legislation that will roll back the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan in West Virginia.

Senator Capito’s proposed legislation is called ARENA, or the Affordable Reliable Energy Now Act. Co-sponsored by US Senator Joe Manchin, the bill would provide a way for a state’s governor to opt out of a state or federal plan that could negatively impact economic growth or electricity ratepayers.

Creative Commons Photo

A 27-year-old Charleston man has been charged with first-degree murder in the heroin overdose death of a 43-year-old woman.

The Charleston Gazette reports that Steven Craig Coleman was charged over the weekend after Charleston police received the final state medical examiner's report on the Feb. 14 death of Melody Ann Oxley.

Freedom Industries
AP

  A judge has rejected a $6.7 million bankruptcy plan by the company behind a January 2014 chemical spill.

In a Charleston federal bankruptcy court filing Wednesday, Judge Ronald Pearson said Freedom Industries and state environmental regulators haven't agreed on cleanup terms at the Charleston spill site. Pearson ordered Freedom to comply with state cleanup orders.

W.Va. State Police
wikimedia / Wikimedia

West Virginia State Police say one of its vehicles along with two guns and an officer's badge were stolen during a traffic stop.

State Police issued an advisory Tuesday saying the blue-and-gold marked 2014 Ford Explorer was taken about 9 a.m. on U.S. 522 in Berkeley Springs.

Pills, Drugs, Prescriptions, prescription drugs
RayNata / wikimedia

A report says infractions found at a pain clinic closed by the state included unsecured guns and medication errors.

The Charleston Gazette obtained the state inspection report through a Freedom of Information Act request. The newspaper says the report shows that Hope Clinic's Charleston facility employed former police officers who routinely carried concealed weapons.

Division of Highways

State police may soon crack down on reckless drivers going past Charleston work zones.

Department of Transportation spokesman Brent Walker tells the Charleston Daily Mail that reckless driving and excessive speeding through interstates have become a growing problem. Although no timetable exists yet for the increased enforcement, Walker says State Police will be addressing the issue soon.

Chattman Photography / The Sea The Sea

Acoustic folk duo The Sea The Sea are coming back to the Mountain State this month to play a couple shows. If the name sounds familiar, it's probably because they've played a couple times on NPR's Mountain Stage, or because one of the band members is a Charleston native or because they just play great music. 

Decades before same-sex marriage became legal, the Reverand Jim Lewis of Charleston, West Virginia, sparked outrage by blessing the unions of gay men and lesbians. 

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting, this is "Us & Them" the podcast where we tell stories from America's cultural divides.

wikimedia

Over 300 teens will be at the Capitol this weekend for a mock legislative session. Teenagers from all over the state who are part of the Youth Leadership Association: Youth in Government will travel to Charleston to hold a student led, mock legislative session for three days.

West Virginia Division of Culture and History / State Archives

Broadcaster Harry Brawley died on March 25, 1992, at age 82. The Charleston native was a polio survivor. He eventually learned to walk but struggled with it his entire life. After earning two degrees from West Virginia University, Brawley became a teacher. At Charleston High School, he had the novel idea of incorporating the radio into the classroom. In 1945, he became the director of public affairs for Charleston’s WCHS radio station and won an award for his “School of the Air,” a pioneering program for high schoolers.

photo by Cecelia Mason

Appalachia is no stranger to industrial or environmental disasters that affect our water. Because of crumbling water infrastructure in many coalfield communities, folks often turn to bottled water for regular use.

But not all bottled water is equal. At least that’s according to judges at the 25th annual Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting & Competition, which took place February 19-22. The competition judges the taste of bottled water, purified water, and municipal city waters from across the world were judged.

Brynn Kusic

Racism and homophobia, love and tolerance--none of these are new to Appalachia. Today, we explore the stories of Appalachians who are moved to spread love, not hate.

In West Virginia, a racist hate crime shakes a community to spread a message of tolerance.

And a Kentucky songwriter’s high lonesome tune is inspired by a gay coal miner’s true story.

Steve Shaluta / West Virginia Division of Tourism

  A homeless man who says a Charleston policeman tossed his backpack off a bridge has agreed to a settlement in exchange for agreeing not to sue the city.

The Charleston Gazette reports that Andrew Joel Hunt settled for $1,500, according to an agreement. The newspaper said the backpack tossed into the Elk River contained a laptop and photographs of his late wife.

Patrolman Brian Lightner had been on paid leave since Sept. 9 following the August incident involving Hunt.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It was some ten days before all of the families affected by the tap water ban following Charleston’s chemical spill were able to return to life as usual within their homes. And many did just that, once again drinking, cooking and bathing with water straight from the tap. The same, however, can’t be said for every family in the valley including Lida Shepherd, who says she still won’t drink the water.

WGBH

Would you like to see the entire first episode of Masterpiece's Downton Abbey, Season 5 in a theater (and before all the spoilers start coming in?) Call your friends and make a date to join us for these special premiere events  in Beckley (December 7), Charleston (December 9), and Morgantown (December 14)!

bus service
Barons Bus Lines

A new bus service between Charleston and Morgantown is becoming a popular choice for travelers.

Cindy Fish with the state Division of Transit says ridership on the I-Ride 79 bus service is growing daily. In October, 763 passengers, or about 25 per day, rode the buses.

Fish tells The State Journal that the bus service is seeing a lot of repeat business.

The Division of Public Transit launched the I-Ride 79 service on July 1. The service includes stops in Clendenin, Flatwoods, Weston, Clarksburg and Fairmont.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On West Virginia Morning, Barbara Hicks Lacy remembers what it was like growing up in segregated Charleston.  And Glynis Board reports on the Division of Natural Resources' efforts to wipe out invasive species in the state.

Courtesy of the W.Va. State Archives, Bernidean Brown Collection

In Charleston, those who grew up during segregation remember a tight knit community in the downtown neighborhood known as The Block. During the 30's and 40's Barbara Hicks Lacy grew up in this neighborhood, and she's one of the remaining residents who vividly recalls The Block, which today has all but disappeared. The West Virginia Center for African-American Culture and Arts recently invited her to share her story at the West Virginia State Archives.

When she was a kid, Lacy's best friend, named Baby Sue, was white, and so they weren't allowed to attend the same school.

@yeagerairport / Twitter

  PEOPLExpress is planning to offer low-fare flights from Charleston's Yeager Airport to Orlando starting next month.

Officials on Wednesday announced the new flights that will begin on Oct. 16.

Service between Charleston and Orlando will operate on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays with Boeing 737 aircraft. Introductory fares start at $49 each way.

Officials say Charleston is the first destination to be added outside the PEOPLExpress base at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport in Virginia.

Pages