Carbon Emissions

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin announced yesterday the state had enter nearly 70 pages worth of comments in response to the federal Environmental Protection Agency's proposed rule to limit carbon emissions across the country. The rule was released in June, but Monday was the final day for public comment.

Dr. Carolyn Stuart and the state Office of Minority Affairs will sponsor a Minority Business Expo in Charleston this week meant to connect small business owners and entrepreneurs with resources to help grow their operations.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Monday is the final day the federal Environmental Protection Agency will accept comments on their proposed rule to limit carbon emissions from coal fired power plants.

The EPA announced the rule in June of this year aimed at cutting CO2 emissions for the country by 30 percent by 2030. Individually if the rule were approved as is, West Virginia would have to cut its emissions by 15 percent compared to 2012 measurements.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Landfilling has been the main source of getting rid of waste for centuries. But a new technology coming to West Virginia may change how we think of waste disposal, and in the long run, help our environment.

On West Virginia Morning, a report about a study that explores the health benefits of lower carbon emissions and we’ll learn more about a new report released yesterday about economic recovery in the state and the transition from coal to natural gas. 

Marcus Constantino (@AMTino) / Charleston Daily Mail

   West Virginia officials joined hundreds of coal miners and coal supporters at an electricity and energy jobs rally.

The Wednesday event at Pittsburgh's Highmark Stadium included Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, Ohio Lt. Governor Mary Taylor, labor leaders and others.

Officials say the rally is aimed at raising awareness over proposed changed to federal rules about pollution discharged by coal-fired power plants.

epa.gov

A federal appeals court is declining to stand in the way of the Obama administration's efforts to block water pollution from mountaintop removal coal mining.

A panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia issued the ruling Friday, according to The Charleston Gazette.

It concluded that the Environmental Protection Agency was within its authority to consult with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers about Clean Water Act permits for mining operations.

  U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin is encouraging West Virginia residents to speak out on new pollution limits.

Manchin is directing state residents to the Federal Register to voice their concerns regarding the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed limits on carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants. The Federal Register serves as a federal portal where all Americans can voice their comments before any federal government agency's proposed rule can be implemented.

Bernard Pollack/(aflcio)

The United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) is planning to make its objections to proposed EPA rules loud and clear. The union has a rally scheduled at the end of the month in Pittsburgh.


Corey Meadows has been working as a coal miner for eight years. In coalfield counties like Logan, Wyoming and McDowell Workforce data shows coal is still king, remaining one of the top employers and providing some of the highest paying jobs. The coal mining industry supplied close to 21,000 jobs in West Virginia in the 4th quarter of 2013. Those jobs generated about half a billion dollars in earned wages to miners with an average weekly wage of about $1,700; some of the highest paying jobs in the state.

Union of Concerned Scientists

Since this week’s announcement from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposing new regulations that will require states to cut carbon dioxide emission by 2030, West Virginia lawmakers and industry representatives alike have spoken out against them.

The scientific community, however, is speaking out in support of the changes, some even saying they don’t go far enough to combat the growing issues of climate change.

After the EPA announced its Clean Power Plan Monday--aiming to reduce carbon emissions by 30 percent by 2030 based on figures from 2005--we bring reaction from lawmakers, the coal industry, unions, and environmentalists. 

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The United Mine Workers of America is joining the coal industry in a rare occasion to oppose proposed regulations meant to curb carbon emissions.  The industry worries the regulations will financially cripple coal’s economy, as well as West Virginia and everyone dependent on a coal job.

With 95 percent of the energy produced in West Virginia coming from coal fired power plants, many within the industry feel the state will be the hardest hit by the new proposal.

Roger Horton, a retired miner from Logan County paints a grim picture already evolving in coal country.

He sees an EPA ignoring its economic impact on countless coal mining families.

Robb Kendrick / National Geographic

With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency unveiling proposed rules aimed to reduce carbon emissions by 2030, many questions remain about the impact on West Virginia's economy. State officials, union and industry leaders, and environmentalists are all weighing in on the potential impacts of the proposed rules. 

Reducing carbon emissions in West Virginia to meet the EPA's proposed rules will no doubt hinge on the future use of coal, as well as increasing energy use from other sources. 

www.mine-engineer.com

The coal industry is worried that the Environmental Protection Agency’s newly proposed regulations on carbon emissions will cripple the nation’s coal economy.

With 95 percent of the energy produced in West Virginia coming from coal fired power plants, many within the industry feel the state will be the hardest hit by the new proposal.

Roger Horton, a retired miner from Logan County paints a grim picture already evolving in coal country. Since March of 2012 thousands of miners have lost their jobs.  Horton said the EPA new proposed rules ignore the economic impact of its standards on countless coal mining families.

On Monday, the Environmental Protection Agency released a plan to cut carbon pollution by 30 percent from coal-fired power plants by the year 2030. The plan comes as a result of executive actions from President Barack Obama to fight climate change. 

  Lawmakers decide to take more time to review bills, as they get called in for a special session. The Environmental Protection Agency's new regulations on carbon emissions from coal fired power plants will be released next week, leaving concerns for many in the industry. Also, a couple from Elkins who specialize in oral histories are taking a look at all sides of fracking.