Arts & Culture

Staging the Auction to Sell the Collection of a Lifetime

Aug 26, 2014
Frances Yeend and James Benner at the piano
West Virginia and Regional History Center

More than fifty years of marriage… plus two international performing careers… plus a shared passion for seeking out eclectic and interesting objects… adds up to one remarkable collection. World-famous opera singer Frances Yeend  and her husband amassed just such a collection. It’ll be auctioned off starting this weekend at the Sagebrush Roundup near Fairmont.

The city of Huntington is developing a new downtown skateboard park.

It’s been idea that’s been in the works for quite a while. Or better yet, a dream that skateboarders thought they’d never see realized. At a reception yesterday in Huntington, officials broke ground on a skateboard park that is just the beginning for skaters. Charles Holley is the executive director of the city’s department of development and planning.

Dan Schultz

By Dan Schultz and Traveling 219.

It’s Saturday night and the dance floor of the American Heritage Music Hall is crowded with couples swinging, stepping, and shaking to live country and rock ‘n’ roll music.

The music hall is spacious and makes a perfect venue for live music. Its walls are strewn with banjos, guitars, and photographs of early country music stars.

Pricketts Fort Forges New Connections By Teaching Old Skills

Aug 21, 2014
Ed Harris and Jim Mays pay close attention as Greg Bray demonstrates blacksmithing techniques.
Sarah Lowther Hensley

The blacksmith is one of the most enduring figures from the early days of American history. The art form calls to mind strength, ingenuity and craftsmanship…fire, iron and sweat. But in the age of technology and 3-D printers, what’s to become of this time-tested trade? One West Virginia state park is taking steps to forge new interest in traditional arts.

  This week, "A Change of Tune" host Joni Deutsch interviews Alex Hwang (vocals, acoustic guitar) of indie folk group Run River North about the band's self-titled debut. The discussion also veers into the Korean-American band's connections to Honda, their definition of folk music, and how the group was influenced by, of all things, rap and hip-hop music. If you’re a fan of indie folk music with a twist, this interview is recommended for you.

Cecelia Mason / WV Public Radio

Wildflower photos are being sought for West Virginia's next "Roadsides in Bloom" calendar.

The state departments of Environmental Protection and Transportation are sponsoring the 12th annual West Virginia Operation Wildflower calendar photo contest. 

College Football doesn’t just happen in Huntington or Morgantown on fall Saturday’s in the state. It’s happening in the Mountain East Conference.

A faith based organization plans to develop land in West Virginia to create a youth camp. The New River Gorge Regional Development Authority made the announcement earlier this week.

Young Life, a non-denominational Christian organization, plans to build an adventure camp in Nicholas County close to Mt. Nebo.

The organization has 35 camps around the globe according to their website. In a release, Young Life’s state Director, Scott Berg, said it was the outdoor activities, and landscape that attracted the group to West Virginia.


  The National Park Service has completed a study of the Shepherdstown Battlefield and related resources.

Congress ordered the study to determine whether the Civil War battlefield should be added to the national park system. It could become an addition to either Harpers Ferry National Historical Park or Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland.

Tammy Stidham with the park service tells The Journal that the study looked at historical significance, natural resources and economic uses.

Capital punishment is debated in Kentucky.

Coal camp communities are working to cope with dated water systems created by coal companies.

A farmer’s market is provides summer meals to children. 

Questioning Capital Punishment in Kentucky:  Mirroring a national trend, the debate over capital punishment continues to makes headlines in Kentucky. Earlier this month, the state legislature held the first public hearing testimony on the death penalty since it was reinstated in 1976. As Kentucky Public Radio’s Jonathan Meador found that arguments for and against a bipartisan legislative effort to abolish capital punishment boil down to, in part, a moral quandary over vengeance versus forgiveness.

Laurie Cameron

After contracting polio as a young boy, Glen Irvine spent most of his life in a wheelchair, but his mandolin almost never left his side.

Although he’s virtually unknown outside of Pocahontas County, West Virginia, Irvine--or Dude, as he was known--was one of the area’s most gifted musicians. One of the founding members of the Black Mountain Bluegrass Boys, Dude was a virtuoso, self-taught musician. Although Dude he passed away at the age of 52 in 1973, his bluegrass band continues to play all around West Virginia today.

Mike Vance of Morgantown Brewing Company
Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

IPAs, Stouts, Hefewiezens, and Ales.

If you’re in Huntington or Wheeling this weekend, you’re bound to get a taste of some locally-brewed varieties at the Rails and Ales Festival or the Mountaineer Brewfest.

But, brewers from around the state aren’t just hoping to raise awareness about their products with these events, they’re also looking to influence the way they do business by getting the attention of state lawmakers.

Clark Davis

Drug and law enforcement officials were in Huntington Wednesday as the Huntington Police department outlined their fight.

The National Drug Control Policy Acting Director Michael Botticelli was in Huntington Wednesday with Congressman Nick Rahall to take a look at the efforts being made by the Huntington Police Department to fight the use and trafficking of illegal drugs. Captain Hank Dial gave an overview.

Clark Davis

A local factory that’s been vacant for more than ten years could be the next step in making Huntington the go-to place for artists in the state.

The Coalfield Development Corporation hopes a new idea can lead to a great outcome. They’ve purchased the former Corbin garment factory property in Westmoreland, a neighborhood just inside Huntington’s city limits in the west end of town. The Wayne County Economic Development Authority sold them the property for $110,000 in an effort to spark development in the area.

Kentucky pastors sound off about gay marriage.

A former addict urges drug courts to address the roots of addiction.

The America Legion says the VA is a system worth saving.

 

John Hale

Abracadabra – shortened to just “Abra” in the hallways of WV Public Broadcasting—is a locally produced program for children that combines magic and ventriloquism with nutrition, health, exercise and safety.  The show is hosted and produced by physician/magician/ventriloquist Michael Adelman, the President of the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine.

Characters like Daisey, Salty the Pirate, Professor Science, and Duk (the magical duck) sing, dance, learn, and watch magic tricks. And of course there’s Joey, a bright well-meaning, mischievous boy puppet. Glynis Board visited set this week to talk to Adelman and Joey as the fourth season of production wraps up.


WVNS-TV

 Theatre West Virginia has rebounded from tough financial times and is looking forward to next year's season.

The Register-Herald reports that more than 5,000 people attended 17 performances of the outdoor historical drama "Hatfields and McCoys" at Cliffside Amphitheatre at Grandview.

Jessica Lilly

There’s a culture of music that’s been passed down orally through the hills of West Virginia for many generations.

Old time music has roots in Celtic and Native American cultures, as well as American ballads and popular music and poems that passed on through oral tradition. The practice of learning young the tunes of their ancestors is alive and well in Sophia, in Raleigh County.

“There’s a lot of good words in an old country song," Carl Hensly of Beckley said. "A lot of times it’s something that they go through."

Hensly is part of a small group of old time country, folks, bluegrass and gospel lovers that meet once a week at Sophia Fire Department in Raleigh County. The door is open to anyone that wants to join on Tuesday nights.


The stats gurus at FiveThirtyEight have broken down Bob Ross' artistic output. Want to know what percentage of his paintings have at least one tree? What about what percentage has a mountain?

The Patron Saint of Ugly, Marie Manilla
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

 

For many people, summer is a time to get lost in literature. And this year, Huntington author Marie Manilla’s new book, The Patron Saint of Ugly is ending up on many summer reading lists. The story is set in a fictional West Virginia town, and most of it is told in the form of transcripts of archived tapes.

Manilla's lead character, Garnet Ferrari, is believed to possess magical healing powers. Her bright red hair and port-wine stains all over her body lead pilgrims from all over the world to seek help through her supposed powers. Yet, Garnet is dead set on dispelling rumors of her abilities, blurring the lines between fact and fiction--furthering the mystery of who she might be.

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