American Experience

Doug Estepp / Coal Country Tours

The West Virginia Mine Wars is a period of our state’s history that until around the 1980s was often censored or left out in classrooms across the state. But a new class through Shepherd University's Lifelong Learning Program will offer tools for history teachers in West Virginia and beyond.

Don't Miss This Tribute to Walt Disney

Sep 14, 2015
Courtesy of Condé Nast Archive/Corbis

Watch American Experience: Walt Disney, a two-part presentation Monday, September 14 at 9:30 p.m. and Tuesday, September 15 at 9 p.m.

RSVP for a Preview of 'Last Days in Vietnam'

Apr 20, 2015

Join a live online screening event featuring the Academy Award-nominated documentary Last Days in Vietnam. A special guest appearance by filmmaker Rory Kennedy kicks off a 50-minute preview of the PBS film.

Chat with a live panel of veterans and Vietnamese Americans from the film that escaped hours before the fall of Saigon 40 years ago this April.

Photographer Michael Keller /

On April 27 and 28, West Virginia Public Broadcasting presents two nights of programs that look back at the era of the Vietnam War, 1964 through 1975. From the politics of the time, the protests, the casualties and finally the fall of Saigon, these programs reflect on the impact of the events that saw about 36,578 West Virginians serving, and ultimately reporting the highest death rate among all states. 

Courtesy WGBH

American Experience: The Amish, Tuesday February 4 at 8 p.m., followed by the premiere of The Amish: Shunned, 9 p.m. on West Virginia PBS

Forever enshrined in myth by an assassin's bullet, Kennedy's presidency long defied objective appraisal. Recent assessments have revealed an administration long on promise and vigor, and somewhat lacking in tangible accomplishment.

JFK: American Experience begins Tuesday, November 11 at 9 p.m. on West Virginia PBS, and concludes on November 12.

The Legendary Broadcast of "War of the Worlds"

Oct 22, 2013
Courtesy of Photofest, Inc.

On October 30, 1938, just after 8 p.m. on the east coast, the millions of Americans tuned to CBS Radio were treated to an unusual dramatization of H.G. Wells’s classic "The War of the Worlds," performed by 23-year-old wunderkind Orson Welles and his Mercury Theater on the Air. Although most listeners understood that the program was a radio drama, the next day’s headlines reported that thousands of others — perhaps a million or more — were plunged into panic, convinced that America was under a deadly Martian attack.