West Virginia Morning

Weekdays at 7:41 a.m.
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Whether it's important news events, interesting features about people and places, the latest in environmental news, stories about education or the economy, West Virginia Public Broadcasting's team of experienced reporters bring listeners in-depth stories and interviews from around the state.    

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West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a year ago this week, white supremacist groups descended on Pikeville, Kentucky, aiming to rally “white working families,” where they were met by anti-fascist groups from across Appalachia and elsewhere in the country. After a deadly incident in Charlottesville, Virginia in August, many of these white supremacist groups fractured as a result of increased scrutiny and internal power struggles.

There is evidence that remnants of those groups have recently sprung up in north-central West Virginia. Dave Mistich takes a look some incidents where the groups have been active, the community reaction and how to identify such messages if you find them in your own neighborhood.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On the latest episode of WVPB’s podcast Us & Them, host Trey Kay puts an episode they produced back in 2015 under the microscope. The episode featured a conversation between West Virginian Karl Priest, a retired public school teacher, and physicist Christopher Keating.

When this show was originally released, some listeners thought Trey handled the whole thing badly. So he went back to see where things went off the rails.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Kentucky ranks in the top five highest number of drug overdoses in the country. It also has one of the highest of Hepatitis C, and while HIV/AIDS cases are declining the U.S., Kentucky holds steady with new cases. Much of this can be traced back to people who use IV drugs, using needles or syringes to inject opioids.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a new investigative documentary dissects how public health officials and environmental regulators at both the state and federal level handled the 2014 chemical spill, which left hundreds of thousands of people without potable water.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On Sunday, April 15, Temple Beth El and the Beckley community will gather at WVU Tech to remember those who were killed during the Holocaust. On this West Virginia Morning, Alderson Broaddus journalism student Lora Owston reports the annual event was inspired by the story of the late Max Lewin, who moved Beckley after escaping the horrors of the holocaust himself.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, hundreds of West Virginians travel from the Eastern Panhandle to Maryland or Washington D.C. every weekday for work. These commuters catch the Maryland-based MARC train, or Maryland Area Regional Commuter. But during this year’s West Virginia legislative session, lawmakers debated the future of the MARC train in the state. As Liz McCormick reports, Maryland threatened to discontinue MARC service to West Virginia unless certain provisions were met.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, for many teens, the prom is the epitome of their high school experience. But for LGBTQ students, it can be a challenge to feel like they belong. So this year, some West Virginia students decided to start a new tradition. Molly Born reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, after Russian-backed hackers probed election-related systems in at least 21 states in 2016, election officials, whose focus traditionally on making sure polling places run smoothly and efficiently, now have to focus on protecting their computer systems. Although West Virginia wasn’t targeted in 2016, the secretary of state’s office is teaming up with the National Guard to take precautions. Dave Mistich takes a look at the partnership, which is paving the way for secure elections in the digital age.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a vacant hotel in Williamson, Mingo County, is set to open as a sober-living facility, run by the county’s housing authority. As Molly Born reports, the complex is likely to be a controversial addition to the southern West Virginia town hit hard by the opioid epidemic.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, President Donald Trump held a roundtable discussion Thursday in White Sulphur Springs that was originally billed to highlight the impact of last year’s federal tax reform legislation. But, at various points, Trump veered off course to address issues such as immigration, trade, energy policy and the race for U.S. Senator Joe Manchin’s seat. Dave Mistich brings us the details.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Yesterday marked the 50th Anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. On this West Virginia Morning, one of the national journalists who covered King’s final speech the day before his death, West Virginia native Ed Rabel, speaks with Roxy Todd about his memories of King.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a student at Concord University worked through trauma by finding ways to express herself with art. She’s hoping a degree in art will help her teach others how to find the same freedom. But without the help of a new program at Concord, she may have quit school. Jessica Lilly reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, in an effort to get more people who are addicted to opioids into treatment, the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources has awarded a $260,000 grant to the Prestera Center to establish a team in Kanawha Valley that visits overdose patients and tries to convince them to get into treatment.  That program is the second of its kind in the state. Kara Lofton take us to Huntington where West Virginia's first quick response team was launched in December.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Ohio Valley’s opioid crisis has given rise to a new health threat: the region now has some of the nation’s highest risk areas for outbreaks of needle-borne disease such as HIV. Health experts say a needle exchange is a good defense, but exchange programs face public opposition. That was the case in Bourbon County, Kentucky, where local officials had twice rejected the idea. As part of the Ohio Valley ReSource series “Rural Risk,” Mary Meehan visited the county as people again considered a needle exchange.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, during the teacher strike a couple of weeks ago, educators were asking for two main things: a pay raise, and a fix for the public employees health insurance program -- PEIA. While the program’s finance board ultimately agreed to freeze proposed changes that would have increased insurance costs, truly fixing PEIA in the long term might not be that simple. Kara Lofton takes a look at the rising cost of health care nationally and some of the other factors that affect the state employee healthcare program.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the U.S. Detention Facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is the longest-standing war prison in our nation’s history.

Trey Kay, host of WVPB’s podcast Us & Them, has been thinking a lot about how Guantanamo compares to similar detention facilities throughout history. He recently interviewed journalist and Parkersburg native Andrea Pitzer, who just published a book that provides an extensive history of concentration camps. She says if you want to know about the history of -- or current state of -- concentration camps, look at Cuba. We have part of the latest Us & Them episode called “Suburb of Hell.”

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, big natural gas pipelines and plants that use that gas are under construction across the region.

Many of those jobs have gone to labor unions, and now unions are using their political clout to advocate for oil and gas. That’s given the gas industry a powerful ally in labor-friendly Pennsylvania. For State Impact Pennsylvania, the Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from West Virginia high schools students gearing up for the March for Our Lives event in Washington, D.C.; a farmer and chef who uses maple syrup as a main ingredient in his recipes; a former coal miner and veteran who has been honored with the President’s Lifetime Achievement Award in volunteerism; and this week's Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, President Donald Trump’s call to implement the death penalty for drug traffickers grabbed headlines Monday. But public health officials are stressing other elements of the administration’s plan to address the opioid crisis. Aaron Payne spoke with the acting director of the Centers for Disease Control about plans for the Ohio Valley.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Center for Disease Control’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health released a study last month on the largest cluster of complicated black lung cases ever reported. Kara Lofton spoke with WVU School of Public Health physicians Carl Werntz and Anna Allen about the study and what it means for West Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore attempts to finding solutions to the region’s opioid epidemic, and we hear a story from the Ohio Valley ReSource on the potential impacts of tariffs on imported steel and aluminum.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginia Public Broadcasting is partnering with the Concord University’s Social Work and Sociology Department for the second annual Opioid Symposium and Job Fair.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginia Public Broadcasting had the chance to interview our U.S. senators about the issues facing Congress and the nation. Usually, our reporters come up with the questions, but this time, we asked you, our audience, to come up with questions to ask Sen. Shelley Moore Capito.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Since late February tree sitters have been perched in two trees atop Peters Mountain in Monroe County. They are so remote, few have seen or heard directly from the protestors, but still there’s plenty of people noticing. Nancy Andrews reports. 

And we’ll hear a preview of this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, which explores the lessons of the recent W.Va. Teacher Strike.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Saturday March 17th is “Mountain State Maple Day” in West Virginia. Sugar shacks and maple operations around the state will open their doors to the public. Maple syrup has a long tradition in the high mountain regions of our state, and the industry is growing. As part of our ongoing series called “Appetite Appalachia”, this morning, we’ll hear two stories about maple syrup farmers in the Mountain State. It’s part of a new collaboration between West Virginia Public Broadcasting and the West Virginia Department of Agriculture. In this episode of West Virginia Morning, we meet Brandon Daniels, a producer who has been making maple syrup for nearly 30 years.   


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Lawmakers discussed several bills around opioid abuse and prevention this session, including the Opioid Reduction Act and have re-examined the state's medical marijuana law. Michael Brumage is the new director of the WV office of Drug Control Policy. Health reporter Kara Lofton talked to him last week about the role his office plays in implementing legislative policy. 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an excerpt from our latest Us & Them podcast episode called, “The Black Talk.”

Do you remember the first time you learned that police may think of you as a threat? If you’ve never been given the talk on how to conduct yourself when stopped by the police, chances are you’re not African-American.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the 2018 regular session of the West Virginia Legislature ended at midnight on Saturday. The final hours were hectic at times. Many bills passed at the last minute and others died on the chamber floors. Senior reporter Dave Mistich was in the thick of things at the Capitol. He spoke with news director Jesse Wright about those final hours.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Wyoming County was the first to decide to walk off the job during the recent statewide teacher strike, starting what some folks are calling a labor movement. Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly caught up with Wyoming County teacher Nina Tunstelle on her way up to Charleston before the walkout ended.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the teacher work stoppage is over and schools are back in operation, so now attention at the Capitol has shifted to the state’s budget.

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