PRI's The World

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PRI's The World® is your world revealed. It's about the events, trends, and personal tales that connect us around the globe. ~Marco Werman hosts an hour of surprising angles, unexpected insights, and engaging voices to illuminate what's going on in the world, and why it matters to you.

International experts investigating the disappearance of 43 students in Mexico in 2014 were targeted with spyware sold to the government, cybersecurity experts said this week.

Adding to a snowballing scandal over spying on journalists, activists and other public figures in Mexico, computer security experts confirmed that the independent investigation into the disappearance and alleged massacre — an atrocity that drew worldwide condemnation — was targeted with highly invasive spyware known as Pegasus.

What a manly week it’s been!

In Kiev, assassinations are becoming commonplace

Jun 30, 2017

An explosion that killed a top Ukrainian military intelligence official in his car on Tuesday wasn’t the only high-profile assassination that’s struck Kiev lately.

In fact, the killing of Col. Maskym Shapoval wasn’t even the only car bomb attack — nor the only assassination the Ukrainian government has blamed on Russia.

At least five attempted or successful assassinations have targeted Ukrainian officials or other prominent figures in Ukraine in the past year.

Yulia Galiamina, a well-respected Russian opposition leader, has been recovering from a concussion at the neurosurgical department of Botkin Hospital, where an ambulance brought her after an opposition rally earlier this month.

A Moscow policeman with the OMON special unit had smashed Galiamina’s face, breaking her teeth and damaging her jaw. But the accident did not break her will and her stamina: Even in a hospital bed with a hellish headache, she continued to organize a new anti-government rally.

The battle is still raging in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul.

ISIS militants are cornered in the Old City. Iraqi and coalition forces are advancing slowly, capturing as little as one city block per day — if that. And ISIS fighters continue to strike back. On Wednesday, they seemed to detonate explosives at Mosul's 12th-century mosque. That iconic structure — with its famous leaning minaret — is now in ruins.

Nabih Bulos, a special correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, left Mosul on Tuesday. He says ISIS is using everything it has to hold on.

Mexican women lead initiatives to rescue native tongues

Jun 21, 2017

When Gabriela Badillo traveled to Mérida, Yucatán, more than a decade ago, she encountered children who were timid about speaking the Mayan language. As she later came to understand, fear and discrimination were factors that affected the home teaching and use of the region’s native tongue.

“Children were a bit embarrassed to speak Mayan. ... Some mothers opted to not teach them the native tongue to avoid discrimination,” Badillo recalled.

The US shares the blame for a massacre in Mexico

Jun 20, 2017

The "war on drugs" has been part of American policy for so long that it's sometimes difficult to remember that the DEA wages that war every day, on both sides of the border with Mexico.

But it's incredibly difficult to counter the power cartels can hold over the Mexican government, and when things wrong, there are deadly reprecussions. 

Pakistanis go wild after cricket triumph over India

Jun 19, 2017

Pakistanis went wild Sunday after a surprise sporting triumph over its archrival, India.

“Cricket is the blood and heart of our nation,” says journalist Bina Shah, in the Pakistani city of Karachi. “We are so excited when we win and so devastated when we lose.”

The Pakistani national team stunned the cricket world by beating India in the final of an international tournament called the Champions Trophy, in London.

'Letters from Iraq' told through music

Jun 14, 2017

We're excited to share a new collaboration today. We're calling it "FutureFolk." The series is in partnership with the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

To help kick things off, we turn to Rahim AlHaj, an Iraqi-American composer and oud player. He has a new album out called "Letters from Iraq."

AlHaj lives in New Mexico now, but the songs on the album are inspired by actual letters sent by people in Iraq.

Russia roiled by protests against Putin and corruption

Jun 13, 2017

On Monday, thousands joined protests in cities across the length of Russia — from Vladivostok on the Pacific coast to St. Petersburg on the Baltic Sea, and from Murmansk in the Arctic north to the Olympic city of Sochi in the south.

Citizens were protesting against Vladimir Putin’s government and its corruption. 

In Moscow, the protests turned violent, with police using tear gas to try to disperse the demonstrators. Hundreds of people have been arrested.

While Washington and the media were preoccupied with James Comey hearings and Donald Trump press conferences this week, what else was going on that we didn't hear about? Or, ought to be paying closer attention to?

Nick Burns, the undersecretary of state for political affairs under George W. Bush, is a professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School. The World's Marco Werman caught up with him so he could remind us about some issues that may have been overshadowed by the latest drama in Washington.

Trump's barbed condolences land with a thud in Iran

Jun 8, 2017

The lights will go dark on the Eiffel Tower tonight as a tribute to the victims of Wednesday's terrorist attack in Tehran. 

Still, many Iranians say they're not feeling the sort of outpouring of support and sympathy that usually follows an ISIS assault. 

"Honestly, I didn't expect the people of the world to be so quiet about it," says Tehran resident Roya Saadat. "My friends on Facebook, they felt sorry, but we saw on social media that some countries, especially Arab countries, were happy about it." 

Juanes has a new album out. It's called "Mis Planes Son Amarte." And in my humble opinion, it stands out for several reasons.

First, it’s really good. Juanes made the album with help from some young hip-hop producers from his hometown of Medellín, Colombia. And that collaboration helps many of the songs sound both edgy and rooted in Colombian musical tradition at the same time. You can hear that mix on “El Ratico,” featuring Colombian American singer Kali Uchis.

The recent attack in Portland, Oregon, has gotten many thinking about the kind of bravery it takes to jump in and help someone being harassed. And also the kind of bravery it takes to go out of your home wearing a visible sign that you're a Muslim.

Both forms of bravery were on display in Portland when two men died trying to help a couple of young women on a train, one of them wearing a hijab.

Greece's economic crisis has been going on for nearly a decade, so it may seem like old news. But for the people who live there, the disaster hasn’t faded — it’s only been compounded by the refugee crisis, with thousands of migrants from the Middle East landing on the shores of Lesbos since 2015.

Maybe it’s the gobsmacking, hyperventilating pace of reality in 2017 that’s gotten the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” so much combing over and analysis and appreciation. Fair enough. So here’s one more take.

New questions are being raised over a meeting between Jared Kushner — Donald Trump's son-in-law and special adviser — and a Russian banker named Sergei Gorkov.

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