Marketplace

Weekdays 6-6:30 p.m.

Marketplace is produced and distributed by American Public Media (APM), in association with the University of Southern California. The programs focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace  is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

Official Website: http://www.marketplace.org/

The Department of Education isn't your typical go-to for high drama in Washington, D.C. But this week hasn't been typical. First, President Trump's budget proposal called for drastic cuts to the department's budget. Then, James Runcie, who oversaw the office that manages the federal government's $1.3 trillion student loan portfolio, walked.

Trump sounds off about Germany's trade surplus, again

May 26, 2017

President Trump sounded off in a meeting with G-7 officials yesterday, allegedly saying that Germany is “bad, very bad” for running up a trade surplus with the U.S., selling millions of cars on American shores. This is not the first time the president has called out Germany on trade, and it’s safe to say that the U.S. relationship with one of its closest allies has chilled considerably since January. But, politics aside, the manufacturing relationship between Germany and the U.S. is gigantic.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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Kai Ryssdal

Ana Swanson of The Washington Post and Nela Richardson of Redfin join us to discuss the week's business and economic news. This week, they talk about Donald Trump's plan on achieving 3 percent economic growth and if the math adds up. How does Paul Ryan plan on dealing with the administration's budget? Plus, we revisit the latest Congressional Budget Office score on the GOP health care plan.   

Why Ramadan is a big deal for Arab TV networks

May 26, 2017
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Kai Ryssdal and Maria Hollenhorst

This Saturday marks the beginning of Ramadan. Muslims worldwide will spend the next 30 days fasting from dawn until dusk. But when families gather to break the fast after the sun goes down, many observe another Ramadan tradition — binge-watching television. Arab TV networks craft content with widespread appeal in the Islamic community for this time of year, but it's also a way to shape public opinion. Marwan Kraidy is a professor of communications at the University of Pennsylvania and an expert on Arab media.

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Kai Ryssdal

Jared Kushner is the son-in-law of the president of the United States, a senior official in the Trump White House and, according to some reports, a person of interest in the FBI's investigation of the Trump campaign and Russian interference. He's also a big name in commercial real estate. Although he's stepped away from a formal role managing his family's real estate businesses, he's still a beneficiary of the company and its investments.

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Tony Wagner

When 16-year-old Rileigh Smirl opens up Instagram, she pretty much ignores its newest and most-prominent feature. The little bubbles at the top that are supposed to show everyone’s “Stories" — a collection of photo and video slideshows decorated with stickers, drawings, filters and so on.

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John Morrison

On summer holidays like Memorial Day, beaches can get pretty crowded. Now, to ease the congestion, some beaches have started banning things like tents and barbecues. 

And while these restrictions may please some beachgoers, they’re frustrating for a few business owners who think tourists may take their gear -and their wallets- elsewhere. 

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Jana Kasperkevic

It’s here. Memorial Day weekend, the official start to the summer.

Minorities increasingly priced out of housing market

May 26, 2017
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Adam Allington

It’s getting harder and harder for middle-class families to afford housing in the U.S.

A new report from the real estate brokerage Redfin shows that in the nation’s 30 biggest metro areas, the number of home listings middle-class families can afford has dropped by 32 percent since 2012.

That shrinking pool of affordable housing is felt most acutely by minorities.

How many burgers has McDonald's actually sold?

May 26, 2017
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Jana Kasperkevic

This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands?  What do you wonder?

Lifting Argentine lemon ban will cost U.S. growers

May 26, 2017
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Adrienne Hill

The U.S. had banned the import of fresh lemons from Argentina for 16 years, citing risk of citrus diseases.

Back in April, President Trump met with the president of Argentina.

“I'll tell him about North Korea, and he'll tell me about lemons,” Trump said. Days later, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced it would lift the ban starting today.

05/26/2017: The South is growing quickly

May 26, 2017

The Census Bureau has released a list of the fastest-growing large cities, and many are concentrated in the South. We'll take a look at which places are getting a bit more crowded and what makes them so appealing. Afterwards, we'll talk about what President Trump's budget cuts could mean for the future food stamps, and then examine how the oil industry is incorporating high-tech in many of its roles.

The White House budget proposal would cut SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program known as food stamps, by $193 billion over 10 years. Right now a family of six gets about $900 a month in food aid. Under Trump’s proposal, that would be the cap, even for households with more people. Many families that receive SNAP and have more than six people are extremely poor — and have multiple young children.  

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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Travis Bubenik

Jack Gregg with tech company Honeywell shows me around a sort of new car showroom for companies shopping for “smart” oilfield gear. The energy industry is increasingly investing in ways to make oil production easier and cheaper. Companies are using cloud technologies and mobile devices. The time-consuming work of driving out to a field to check on equipment can now be done from afar.

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David Brancaccio

If your financial awareness was formed in the 1980s and 1990s, you may have learned to expect too much out of the stock market. There was a long Reagan-Bush-Clinton-era run that led people to believe the stock market had almost magical powers.

But since then, returns haven't been quite the same — a dip that may be playing a role in our country's retirement crisis

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Marketplace

You've heard it before: the robots are coming and they're going to steal our jobs. But, wait a second — the Economic Policy Institute has crunched the data and is now arguing that the effects of automation are a little overstated. One of the authors of the report, Lawrence Mishel, joined us to break down why and what he thinks workers should actually be worrying about. Then to cap off the week, we'll play Silicon Tally with Rachel Metz, an editor at the MIT Technology Review. 

05/26/2017: The future of global trade

May 26, 2017
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Marketplace

President Trump is preparing for his first G7 meeting in Sicily, Italy, where trade policy and climate change will be on the agenda — topics that he and other countries don't exactly see eye to eye on. On today's show, we'll take a closer look at these sources of tension. Afterwards, we'll discuss how much U.S. lemon growers could lose out on from the USDA's decision to lift an Argentine lemon ban, and then examine how the affordable housing crisis is affecting minority families. 

 

 

 

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin faced his second day of grilling on Capitol Hill today, this time appearing before the Senate Finance Committee to discuss his boss's proposed budget for next year. Baked into that budget is the assumption that the U.S. economy will start growing at 3 percent or higher by the year 2021, which is about the average for the past 60-plus years. But it's a lot faster than the more sluggish rate of around 2 percent we've been stuck at since the recession.

Tax collectors are crying poor

May 25, 2017

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney were on Capitol Hill this week sounding the alarm on the debt ceiling. That’s the limit on how much debt the government can rack up. Mnuchin and Mulvaney said Congress might have to lift or suspend the debt limit sooner than planned. Mulvaney said that’s because tax revenues are coming in slower than he expected. Why is there a revenue shortfall?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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Andy Uhler

This is just one of the stories from our "I've Always Wondered" series, where we tackle all of your questions about the world of business, no matter how big or small. Ever wondered if recycling is worth it? Or how store brands stack up against name brands?

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