A Change of Tune

On Saturdays at 10-11 p.m. (and rebroadcasts Fridays at 11 p.m.-midnight)

"The program that never plays the same exact song twice."

Each week, host Joni Deutsch links the past to the present with the best music ranging from emerging artists to classic hits, indie pop to blues rock, and everything in-between. She’ll give you enough music headlines, backstories, and #WVmusic discoveries to get you through your weekend. It’s time for A Change of Tune.

Lisa Sullivan

Ever since 'A Change of Tune' started, we've had a list of folks who we've wanted to talk #WVmusic (and pepperoni rolls) with. Last week, we had the pleasure of marking one of those names off our list when we chatted with the self-proclaimed "Redheaded Stepson of the Huntington Music Scene," Americana rocker Tyler Childers.

Live on the Levee

Get ready, Charleston! Jim Lange, Bill Lynch and Joni Deutsch are coming to town (well, to Live on the Levee, at least).

Amelia Ferrell

It's a new radio year, a new radio perspective for A Change of Tune, and that means a new way of doing our semi-frequent artist chats.

Since July 2014, A Change of Tune has vowed to never play the same exact song twice. Why? Because we like the challenge of playing new and exciting music each week, not to mention the fact that we want to give our listeners a music discovery experience every time they listen.

 

But this weekend, we’re flipping the script.

Let's Talk #WVmusic

Jun 18, 2015
Joni Deutsch

Hey, West Virginia. It's me, Joni Deutsch, your friendly neighborhood public radio host. You have a second to talk #WVmusic? Cool? Cool.

KaiL Baxley

If you’ve ever gone to kailbaxley.com (and you should, it’s the official website for South Carolina retro folk singer KaiL Baxley), you’ll see this quote from The Huffington Post: “He is a musical nomad that tells his tales in his music and his tales are some of the most fascinating you will hear.”

Wikicommons

"Technically, I think I'm a crap singer. I don't have the chops, but I know that I can move people and I can touch them. That interests me more."

The proliferation of  singing talent shows on American TV all suggest that prodigious vocal technique, along with the singing of as many notes (plus ornamentations) is the pinnacle of musical expression.

Wrong.

More is not better. Quality is not defined by quantity.

Chattman Photography / The Sea The Sea

Acoustic folk duo The Sea The Sea are coming back to the Mountain State this month to play a couple shows. If the name sounds familiar, it's probably because they've played a couple times on NPR's Mountain Stage, or because one of the band members is a Charleston native or because they just play great music. 

Steve Gullick

When you think of live records, usually you think of album stop-gaps, in-between releases that don't exactly add or subtract much from a band's sound. Not so for indie folk rock band Phosphorescent, whose newest release, Live at the Music Hall, definitely deserves a listen. We talked with band frontman/founder/CEO Matthew Houck about the band's name, its evolution over the years and even its inclusion in The Amazing Spider-Man 2 soundtrack.  

Bud Carroll

Huntington rocker Bud Carroll has a lot of stories to tell.

For instance, did you know the song that opened his eyes to music came from Vanilla Ice? Or that his teenage guitar-playing impressed blues queen Koko Taylor? 

Biz 3

What do you get when you mix a classically trained voice with dreamy electronic beats? You'll get Niia, an up-and-coming alt-pop singer with a debut EP called Generation Blue. I sat down with Niia to talk about her new release, how she handles stage fright and her love for all things James Bond.

Note: We briefly talk about 50 Shades of Grey (nothing explicit!) and bring up some House of Cards Season 3 spoilers around 19:00 to  27:00, in case you need to avert your ears.

Shervin Lainez

Whether you call it indie pop, alt-folk or punk rock, Lady Lamb (aka Aly Spaltro)'s newest record is a force to be reckoned with. The 25-year-old singer-songwriter sat down to chat with me about her teenage aspirations, upcoming projects and why her moniker still works.

Michael Hays / Twin Cousins Records

If you've been listening to 'A Change of Tune' in recent months, you've probably heard tracks (and chats) from a number of West Virginia bands, including Goodwolf, Ona, Bishops, Coyotes in Boxes and more.

Rozwell Kid

Rozwell Kid is what you'd call a slacker-rock band. On second thought, maybe they're a post-grunge outfit? Whatever you call them (note: frontman Jordan Hudkins believes they play "Hawaiian shirt core"), they're a West Virginia-based group of friends who love good times and great music. Hudkins chats with me about Rozwell Kid's "origin story," the band's new releases and how the Mountain State is still their musical home.

Craig Kief

Singer-songwriter Sam Beam has been releasing indie folk records under the name Iron & Wine for over a decade. With his newest release, Archive Series Volume No. 1, Beam's going back to basics with bedroom folk melodies and down-home whispers. We talk about his music, his new short film, "Dreamers and Makers are My Favorite People" (which features footage from his 2014 stop at the Jerry Run Summer Theater in West Virginia) and, of course, his infamous beard. 

Rhiannon Giddens

This past winter has been a hectic one for Carolina Chocolate Drops frontwoman Rhiannon Giddens. Between recording Dylan covers with Marcus Mumford and Elvis Costello under the moniker The New Basement Tapes and dueting with Iron & Wine's Sam Beam on NBC's Parenthood series finale, she's somehow found time to release her solo recording debut, Tomorrow is My Turn. If you're a fan of spellbinding interpretations of Americana classics, this interview and music are recommended for you.

The Return of the King

Feb 4, 2015
DGMLIVE

The return of King Crimson in 2014 was certainly a surprise to everyone. Robert Fripp, let's just call him the lightning rod of the group as well as its most consistent member, had devoted page after page in his online diary about the bliss of not having to endure what he calls the "wretched life of the professional musician." Fripp writes: "But mostly, the life of the working musician is wretched.

Chris Graham

It's taken two years for Canadian singer-songwriter Andy Shauf's The Bearer of Bad News to reach the States, but now we can finally hear why this Saskatchewan crooner is being hailed as "the next Nick Drake." Without a doubt, Shauf's folk is the kind of folk that makes you pause. If you're a fan of lush, contemplative songwriting, this interview and music are recommended for you.

Brooke Fraser

It's hard to believe that it's been four years since Brooke Fraser released infectious folk pop songs like "Something in the Water." What's even crazier is the New Zealand singer-songwriter's brand new record, which effectively transforms that lighthearted acoustic pop princess into an electrifying alternative pop queen. If you're a fan of Lorde-esque soundscapes that are filled with depth, darkness and beauty, this interview and music are recommended for you.

Ona

They’re earnest, they’re indie, they’re Ona, the five-piece rock outfit that found its start in a sliver of unincorporated Appalachia called Ona, West Virginia. If you're a fan of deliciously mellow alt-rock bands that live by the motto "WWNYD" (that's "What Would Neil Young Do"), this interview and music are recommended for you.

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