A Change of Tune

On Saturdays at 10-11 p.m.

"The program that never plays the same exact song twice."

Each week, host Joni Deutsch links the past to the present with the best music ranging from emerging artists to classic hits, indie pop to blues rock, and everything in-between. She’ll give you enough music headlines, backstories, and #WVmusic discoveries to get you through your weekend. It’s time for A Change of Tune.

Josh Saul

Heed Larry Groce's words, folks: John Mark Nelson is going places.

A shot of the crowd rating new music at our #WhyListen party.
Ryan Fischer / The Parthenon

If you're reading this right now, chances are you made it out to Wednesday night's #WhyListen First Listen Music Party at Black Sheep Burrito & Brews in Huntington.

WVPB First Listen Music Party in Huntington Oct. 14

Oct 2, 2015

Have you ever wondered what makes a new song into a good song? West Virginia Public Broadcasting invites you to the #WhyListen first listen music party on October 14 at 6 p.m at Black Sheep Burrito & Brews in Huntington.

Amanda Hill

Let’s play a game of #WVmusic 'Guess Who,' shall we?

Nooran Matties

If you take a second to look around, you can find hardworking West Virginians in the coolest places.

Jason Lockart / Kid in the Background

What are the Heavy-Set Paw-Paws? What’s it like making music in Beckley, West Virginia? And what does “Appalachian Stank” mean as a music genre? I sat down with the alt-rock group’s frontman Tyler Evans to get to the bottom of these questions and more.

Live on the Levee

Get ready, Charleston! Jim Lange, Matt Jackfert, Bill Lynch and Joni Deutsch are coming to town (well, to Live on the Levee, at least).

Max Nolte

There's no place like public radio when it comes to discovering new and emerging music. And there's no better time than today to be a part of West Virginia's budding music scene.

That's why I was so excited to be a part of NPR's Heavy Rotation to talk about my love for Ona, a Huntington band that has been on my radar for a while but will be on the world's radar soon enough.

Lisa Sullivan

Ever since 'A Change of Tune' started, we've had a list of folks who we've wanted to talk #WVmusic (and pepperoni rolls) with. Last week, we had the pleasure of marking one of those names off our list when we chatted with the self-proclaimed "Redheaded Stepson of the Huntington Music Scene," Americana rocker Tyler Childers.

Live on the Levee

Get ready, Charleston! Jim Lange, Bill Lynch and Joni Deutsch are coming to town (well, to Live on the Levee, at least).

Amelia Ferrell

It's a new radio year, a new radio perspective for A Change of Tune, and that means a new way of doing our semi-frequent artist chats.

Since July 2014, A Change of Tune has vowed to never play the same exact song twice. Why? Because we like the challenge of playing new and exciting music each week, not to mention the fact that we want to give our listeners a music discovery experience every time they listen.

 

But this weekend, we’re flipping the script.

Let's Talk #WVmusic

Jun 18, 2015
Joni Deutsch

Hey, West Virginia. It's me, Joni Deutsch, your friendly neighborhood public radio host. You have a second to talk #WVmusic? Cool? Cool.

KaiL Baxley

If you’ve ever gone to kailbaxley.com (and you should, it’s the official website for South Carolina retro folk singer KaiL Baxley), you’ll see this quote from The Huffington Post: “He is a musical nomad that tells his tales in his music and his tales are some of the most fascinating you will hear.”

Wikicommons

"Technically, I think I'm a crap singer. I don't have the chops, but I know that I can move people and I can touch them. That interests me more."

The proliferation of  singing talent shows on American TV all suggest that prodigious vocal technique, along with the singing of as many notes (plus ornamentations) is the pinnacle of musical expression.

Wrong.

More is not better. Quality is not defined by quantity.

Chattman Photography / The Sea The Sea

Acoustic folk duo The Sea The Sea are coming back to the Mountain State this month to play a couple shows. If the name sounds familiar, it's probably because they've played a couple times on NPR's Mountain Stage, or because one of the band members is a Charleston native or because they just play great music. 

Steve Gullick

When you think of live records, usually you think of album stop-gaps, in-between releases that don't exactly add or subtract much from a band's sound. Not so for indie folk rock band Phosphorescent, whose newest release, Live at the Music Hall, definitely deserves a listen. We talked with band frontman/founder/CEO Matthew Houck about the band's name, its evolution over the years and even its inclusion in The Amazing Spider-Man 2 soundtrack.  

Bud Carroll

Huntington rocker Bud Carroll has a lot of stories to tell.

For instance, did you know the song that opened his eyes to music came from Vanilla Ice? Or that his teenage guitar-playing impressed blues queen Koko Taylor? 

Biz 3

What do you get when you mix a classically trained voice with dreamy electronic beats? You'll get Niia, an up-and-coming alt-pop singer with a debut EP called Generation Blue. I sat down with Niia to talk about her new release, how she handles stage fright and her love for all things James Bond.

Note: We briefly talk about 50 Shades of Grey (nothing explicit!) and bring up some House of Cards Season 3 spoilers around 19:00 to  27:00, in case you need to avert your ears.

Shervin Lainez

Whether you call it indie pop, alt-folk or punk rock, Lady Lamb (aka Aly Spaltro)'s newest record is a force to be reckoned with. The 25-year-old singer-songwriter sat down to chat with me about her teenage aspirations, upcoming projects and why her moniker still works.

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