Renaissance Junkman Says It's No Struggle To Stay in W.Va.

Apr 6, 2016

Thomas Goodman (left) with Rick Wilson and Laurie Lin

Thomas Goodman says it's not a struggle to stay in West Virginia -- it's a choice.

"If you’re a young person and you have a degree of…ambition, and you’re willing to stick it out through the heartache we’re enduring right now, on the backside of that, you’ll write your own ticket," he said. "If you’re willing to assume responsibility and be a leader, the opportunity will present itself."

The Front Porch spoke with Goodman as part of our "The Struggle to Stay" series, co-sponsored with West Virginia Living.

He is a metal recycler who prefers to be called a junkman ("It's more blue collar.") He's also a videographer, musician and Republican candidate for the W.Va. House of Delegates.

Goodman says young people who want West Virginia to emulate Portland or Austin are setting themsleves up for disappointment.

"It was unrealistic for me to expect West Virginia to change to my wants. So therefore, I educated myself about what West Virginia is now, has been historically and could be in the future, and tailored what I wanted professionally out of that," he said.

On The Front Porch podcast, we also hear about his adventures on the crew of a reality TV show about the Hatfield and McCoys.

Subscribe to "The Front Porch" podcast on iTunes or however you listen to podcasts.

An edited version of “The Front Porch” airs Fridays at 4:50 p.m. on West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s radio network, and the full version is available above.

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The Front Porch is underwritten by The Charleston Gazette Mail, providing both sides of the story on its two editorial pages. Check it out:http://www.wvgazettemail.com/