Federal Black Lung Fund May Be in Trouble without Congressional Intervention

Credit West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A new study from the Government Accountability Office finds that the federal fund supporting coal miners with black lung disease could be in financial trouble without congressional action. As Benny Becker reports, the GAO found that the fund’s debt could rise dramatically at the same time that black lung disease is surging.

Also on today's show, the Environmental Protection Agency has been involved in cleaning up PCBs from the Minden site at least three times in the past. Most recently, they contracted the United States Army Corps of Engineers to design a cap for the remaining contaminated soil. That cap was completed in 2002. The EPA has returned to the site, and has been collecting soil samples to determine whether there needs to be a fourth clean-up action. 

Roxy Todd spoke with one EPA official Melissa Linden who has been involved with investigating and researching the Shaffer site for about two and a half years.

And we hear more from the series Opioid Crisis: the Ripple Effect. As the opioid epidemic continues, the effects of the crisis are reaching the newest generation of kids. The number of babies born dependent on drugs because of their mother’s addiction has sky-rocketed. Ideastream’s Lecia Bushak takes a look at a local program designed to keep children of addicted mothers out of foster care.

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