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10:32 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Current: 'Transformed' West Virginia Public Broadcasting Rises to Chemical Spill Challenge

PBS Newshour host Judy Woodruff interviews Ashton Marra of West Virginia Public Broadcasting about the chemical spill in Charleston.
PBS Newshour host Judy Woodruff interviews Ashton Marra of West Virginia Public Broadcasting about the chemical spill in Charleston.
Credit PBS Newshour via YouTube

new story in Current.org says "a transformed West Virginia Public Broadcasting stepped up Jan. 9 with extensive multiplatform coverage of the toxic waste spill."

Current is the news source that covers people in public media. In his story, reporter Andrew Lapin looks at WVPB's coverage of the chemical leak.

"Reporters camped out at the network’s Charleston headquarters around the clock to deliver continuing coverage over the air and via social media and its recently upgraded website," he writes.

Here are some other highlights of our response in the story:

- The Legislature Today scored an exclusive interview with Governor Earl Ray Tomblin

- When Tomblin’s office called WVPB for help with a press conference, the network’s video crew was ready to pitch in alongside for-profit satellite provider The Media Center

- Reporter Ashton Marra appeared on The Takeaway, To the Point, NPR’s newsmagazines and PBS NewsHour

- The network will host a free public taping of its flagship music program Mountain Stage Jan. 19 to help residents take their minds off the spill

But here is my favorite part of the story:

"When (reporter Dave) Mistich got to work on the morning of Jan. 12, two days after the spill, a woman was waiting outside the door to personally thank WVPB for its coverage.

'She didn’t know where to go to thank someone, so she showed up at the station,' Mistich said."