WV Center for Professional Development
1:43 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Advanced Placement Courses Help Students and Teachers Achieve More

The West Virginia Center for Professional Development advances the quality of teaching and management in the schools of West Virginia through (1) the implementation of statewide training, professional staff development, and technical assistance programs and practices to assure the highest quality in such teaching and management; and (2) the provision of technical and other assistance and support to regional and local education agencies in identifying and providing high quality professional staff development and training programs and implementing best practices to meet their locally identified needs.

Opening equity and access to Advanced Placement courses is a mission that the West Virginia Center for Professional Development aggressively works to fulfill. By helping teachers and administrators develop processes and practices that identify students with AP potential, more West Virginia students will have access to these rigorous courses. Ripley High School in Jackson County, W.Va., understands the importance of AP access and is a long-standing member of the AP Success Initiative. This program, offered
by WVCPD, provides additional resources and professional development to schools looking to increase AP participation and success.

While Ripley has been committed to AP for a number of years, the support that the Center provides strengthens and builds upon existing efforts. It is no surprise that a few years ago, a Ripley High School student was the AP Female Scholar of the Year. She took and passed the most AP courses of any female high school student that year. Katie Leaptrot, a first generation college student, explains in this video how her school, her teachers and AP have affected her educational journey.

The WVCPD also helps teachers acheive more.

When Laurel Ferguson, AP teacher at Spring Valley High School, started her journey as an AP teacher, she
experienced a lot of frustration. But she didn't let the struggle deter her. Ferguson was convinced that she
could be a successful AP Calculus teacher, and that her students would achieve. She found her way to the West Virginia Center for Professional Development's AP professional development and something clicked. Listen to her story as originally aired on West Virginia Metronews and posted here with permission by the WVCPD.