West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear from listeners who speak about their journeys to reconnect with their roots in Appalachia -- and return home.

While producing this week's Inside Appalachia show, we asked for your stories of homesickness on Twitter, and we got back variety of heartfelt responses.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, coal retirees are joining forces on a bill with teamsters, iron workers and other unions in an effort to shore up ailing pension plans. Democrats want to see retirement benefits included in the omnibus spending bill needed to prevent a government shutdown.

As Becca Schimmel reports, 43,000 retired miners in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia depend on a pension plan that could be at risk without congressional action.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the science is clear -- addiction runs in families. It’s not just opioids, but alcohol and even tobacco use, too. Kara Lofton takes a look at multigenerational addiction in West Virginia and the challenges families face in breaking the cycle.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In eastern Kentucky’s coal country jobs are scarce and many people struggle with substandard housing. Some high school students think they can help tackle those big problems by building tiny houses. As part of the series, “Changing Course,” Benny Becker of Ohio Valley ReSource reports on a project called “Building It Forward” that has vocational students designing, building and selling tiny homes.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning we hear the next part of our occasional series on the timber and forest products industry – from seedlings to final products, we reach our first final product:  hardwood flooring.  Today independent producer Jean Snedegar visits Armstrong Flooring in Beverly, in Randolph County, and meets the plant manager, Blaine Emery. 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an Inside Appalachia preview. In honor of the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah, which begins Dec. 12, this weekend’s episode of Inside Appalachia explores stories of Jewish-Appalachians.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as coal country looks for a new path forward, some communities are looking to their public schools. Many are changing not just how they prepare students but how they can help meet economic and social challenges.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, coal miners were some of President Trump’s staunchest supporters in the 2016 election. He promised to bring back jobs in the industry, and that promise is tantalizing to some in coal country.

Reporting for StateImpact Pennsylvania, The Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier found coal miners who are sticking with the industry, instead of looking for a new career.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we conclude our 8-month series, The Struggle to Stay. We hear the final chapter of Derek Akal’s story.

Derek is from a coal-camp town called Lynch, in Harlan County, Kentucky. The last time we heard from Derek, he was planning to move to California. But to do that, he needs to save enough money.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, environmental advocates and energy industry stakeholders are meeting in West Virginia’s capitol for two days of hearings on a proposal to repeal carbon emission regulations -- regulations that haven’t yet been implemented.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we'll hear about what's being done in the Ohio Valley to fight food insecurity among veterans. Napoleon famously said that an army marches on its stomach; troops must be fed in order to fight. But what happens when that army fights hunger back home?

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On the is West Virginia Morning, more than 1,000 Ohio Valley farmers used a complicated federal visa program to hire about 8,000 foreign workers for seasonal jobs, last year.

Farmers say the visa program is too bureaucratic, and a bill before Congress promises to cut red tape. But as Nicole Erwin of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports, labor advocates say the bill would strip guest workers of many protections in an industry where wage theft is already a problem.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear the next chapter in The Struggle to Stay. Lately, we’ve been following 21-year-old Derek Akal, a native of eastern Kentucky. We’ve met several generations of his ancestors, and heard the stories of how they moved to and from the coal-camp town in Harlan County, where Derek lives.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, several lawmakers from the Ohio Valley region have joined a bipartisan push to fund what’s called carbon capture and storage. That technology can strip CO2 from power plant emissions. But it is also extremely expensive.

Glynis Board spoke with a journalist who just spent a year traveling around the world to explore the topic.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we have a preview of this week's Inside Appalachia episode, in which we learn more about a four-part series by Us and Them about gun violence, race and urban revitalization in West Virginia.

Inside Appalachia’s Jessica Lilly sat down with Trey Kay, the host of Us and Them, to talk about Charleston’s West Side -- the poorest neighborhood in the city.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, October was black walnut season in Appalachia. It’s when these green, tennis ball-sized nuts rain onto fields, roads, and sometimes, people. They can be dangerous. And their inky juice stains everything they touch.

But for some Appalachians, As Eileen Guo reports, black walnuts are proof that, sometimes, money does grow on trees.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, during a special session of the West Virginia Legislature last month, lawmakers passed a bill that makes redeveloping historic buildings in the state more viable, financially. As Liz McCormick reports, the bill had widespread support from both sides of the aisle, but some are concerned it doesn’t go far enough.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, it’s been more than two weeks since an industrial fire began in Parkersburg at a recycled plastics warehouse. It burned for more than eight days. It’s still largely unknown what exactly burned that week. Dave Mistich spoke with two experts about how air quality was monitored in the wake of the fire.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we have a special show that features the next installment of our Struggle to Stay series following Derek Akal. Derek is a young man from Harlan County, Kentucky whose grandparents encouraged him to leave Appalachia, to go to college and find opportunity out of state.

Due to a recent personal health matter, pianist Bob Thompson will be unable to appear as scheduled at this week’s two sold-out Joy to the World performances in Charleston, WV. The show will continue, with members of Bob’s band accompanying special guest vocalist Landau Eugene Murphy Jr. 

More information here

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