Roxy Todd

Reporter/ Producer Inside Appalachia

Roxy Todd is a reporter and co-producer for Inside Appalachia and has been a reporter for West Virginia Public Broadcasting since 2014. Her stories have aired on NPR’s Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Marketplace. She’s won several awards, including a regional AP Award for best feature radio story, and also two regional Edward R. Murrow awards for Best Use of Sound and Best Writing for her stories about Appalachian food and culture.

In 2017, she won first place in Public Radio News Directors Inc.’s (PRNDI) Nationally Edited Soft Feature category for her story titled “In Coal Country, Farmers get creative to bridge the fresh produce gap.” The radio show and podcast she helps produce, Inside Appalachia, won first place in PRNDI’s Long Documentary category for an episode titled “Hippies, Home Birth and the History of Birthing Babies in Appalachia.”

Roxy is a native of middle Tennessee. In 2005 she graduated from Warren Wilson College, where she studied Creative Writing, theater and education. 

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Money, Cash
2bgr8 / http://2bgr8stock.deviantart.com/art/Money-Cash-113445826

A little over $16 million in life insurance proceeds have gone to the State Treasurer’s Unclaimed Property Division in the past four years, and West Virginians who've lost family members since 2012 may have money owed to them. 


courtesy Crystal Snyder

This is the fourth story about 37-year-old Crystal Snyder. It’s part of our series called The Struggle to Stay.
Last time, we found out that Crystal, a non-traditional student, was in her first semester of college, while also working 33 hours a week for a job-training program called Refresh Appalachia. 
Last summer was an especially stressful time for Crystal, and by August, things got worse. 

Claire Hemme

On this episode of Inside Appalachia, we go on a road trip along the backroads of Appalachia. We discover a rare orchid, a natural icebox and even get the story behind a bus on a rock. 

It's all to help launch a new series called Hidden Gems of Appalachia, celebrating the outdoors and the stories behind mysterious and wondrous places throughout these mountains.

Wikimedia Commons/ Youngamerican

The fight over school consolidation in Nicholas County continues. The West Virginia Board of Education, which is against consolidation, released a statement Thursday saying they’ll appeal their case to the West Virginia Supreme Court. 


Roxy Todd/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Kroger store at Crossings Mall in Elkview reopened at 9 am Wednesday. The store and other businesses at the shopping center closed 14 months ago when the culvert bridge that was its only public access point washed out during the June 2016 flood. 


Kara Lofton/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Between 400-500 people attended a Black Lives Matter rally Sunday at the State Capitol in Charleston. The event was peaceful, with no violence reported. 

Roxy Todd/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It’s been about 20 years since the opioid epidemic started. Appalachia has been called ground zero for this crisis, and the mountain state leads the country in drug overdose deaths. This episode of Inside Appalachia explores how the epidemic is affecting veterans, who are twice as likely to become addicted to opioids, compared with the general, or civilian, population. So some veterans are trying some alternatives to taking opioids for their chronic pain.

Kara Lofton/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Crystal Snyder is a mother of two who's working a new job with a program called Refresh Appalachia, which is helping her learn how to farm. About three thousand squash plants were grown from seed by Crystal and her co-workers in the summer of 2016. That summer she also returned to college. In this installment of The Struggle to Stay, we'll hear what it's been like to juggle work, school and taking care of her family.


Women's March, Donald Trump, Inauguration
Joni Deutsch / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Herbert Henderson Office of Minority Affairs (HHOMA) is hosting an event in Weirton Thursday evening, focused on helping minority residents across West Virginia.

HHOMA invites the public to speak about issues that affect their community, like economic concerns, housing, education and health. Those concerns will then be relayed to Governor Jim Justice. 


Roxy Todd/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

About 80 people attended a candlelight vigil and a protest rally in Charleston Sunday evening. Attendees rallied at the West Virginia State Capitol to speak against racism, white supremacy, and to ask for the removal of the statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson from the Capitol grounds.

Speakers included religious leaders, who spoke about coming together as a community following Saturday’s violent white supremacy protests in Charlottesville, Virginia. The rally was organized by Rise Up WV, a progressive community organizing group. 

Kara Lofton/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In October of 2015, Crystal Snyder, a single mother of two, lost her job. She was working at a t-shirt factory in West Virginia. “There were no women who ran the machines. And so, I kind of raised hell because I wanted to run a machine. You know, I wanted to make more money. I wanted to have more responsibility.”

stock photo

President Donald Trump's Commission on the Opioid Crisis recently recommended that the president declare the opioid crisis a national public health emergency. The commission said that such a declaration could free up money to fight the epidemic.

Back in April, we aired a special report about the opioid epidemic here in Appalachia. So this week, we’re going to revisit that story to remember how some Appalachians became addicted, and what a battle for sobriety can be like.

Kara Lofton/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Appalachian economy is changing. In this episode of Inside Appalachia, hear from people who are switching careers, including former coal miners who are learning computer programming and non-traditional students who’ve graduated from college. Meet the next person in our Struggle to Stay series, a mother of two named Crystal Snyder. She’s also switching careers.

Roxy Todd/ WVPB

This week we meet the next person we’ll be following in our Struggle to Stay series. 37-year-old Crystal Snyder is a single mother of two, who says she wants to stay in West Virginia, where her family has lived for several generations. But being a single mom in West Virginia is challenging for her, and sometimes she worries whether raising two kids in this state is good for their health. 

Nature's Icebox in W.Va

Jul 31, 2017
Roxy Todd/ WVPB

In Hampshire County West Virginia, there is a small mountain ridge called Ice Mountain. Historical records suggest that, years ago, ice could be found here, even in the heat of summer. I recently visited Ice Mountain to find out if ice could still be spotted, and to check out the rare plant species that have existed here since the last ice age. 


Benny Becker

Back in March, Inside Appalachia aired a report about a rise in the number of chronic black lung cases. Since then, NPR’s ongoing investigation uncovered an additional 1,000 cases of the worst form of black lung disease in Appalachia. 

Kara Lofton/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Do people who identify as LGBTQ struggle for acceptance in Appalachia? In this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, we explore how ideas about gender are changing across the country and in the region.

 

Still, some people, like 20-year-old Soleil-Dawe, who lives in Shepherdstown and identifies as gender queer, have found that coming out to their family isn’t easy.

 

Kara Lofton/ West Virginia Public Broadcasting

It used to be that women typically gave birth in home-like environments. Today most women head to the hospital and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that across the U.S., one in every three mothers has a cesarean delivery.  

Recently, Inside Appalachia won first place in Public Radio News Directors Inc.’s (PRNDI), Long Documentary category for an episode titled “Hippies, Home Birth and the History of Birthing Babies in Appalachia.”

U.S. National Archive Jack Corn

This week time travel back to your own childhood summer memories with the Appalachian storytellers.      

courtesy Crystal Wilkinson

Ever hear the word 'Affrilachian'? In the 1990s, a poet in Kentucky named Frank X Walker came up with the term. It refers to African Americans living in Appalachia. 

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