Liz McCormick

Eastern Panhandle Reporter/Producer

Elizabeth McCormick grew up in Charleston, West Virginia with her grandmother. She graduated from Capital High School in 2010 and graduated from Shepherd University in 2014 with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications - Digital Filmmaking, Minor in Theater. During her time at Shepherd, Liz studied abroad at le Université de Pau (University of Pau), in Pau, France for a month in summer 2012, and she was on the first executive board of Shepherd's French Club, which began in spring 2013.

In the summer of 2013, Liz interned with le Festival de Cannes (Cannes Film Festival) in Cannes, France, where she worked in the Producers Network as a guide for those attending. The following year, in summer 2014, Liz interned with West Virginia Public Broadcasting in Charleston. She was later hired as a freelance reporter for WVPB in July of that year, and then hired fulltime in December 2014 as the Eastern Panhandle Reporter/Producer. She is based out of Shepherdstown.

You can hear stories by Liz on West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia. You'll also hear her during morning and afternoon local newscasts. During the state Legislative session, Liz covers the House of Delegates for WVPB's nightly television program The Legislature Today.

Liz has been involved in choir ensembles and vocal technique since she was 7-years-old and has performed on stage in theatrical works since 1999. She's written and produced short films and music videos since high school and is an aspiring singer/songwriter, actor, and novelist. Liz is also a video game enthusiast who loves classic Nintendo 64 games and Pokémon. She has an energetic, orange tabby cat named Calcifer who hardly leaves her lap...or her shoulder.

 

Ways to Connect

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The House voted on a bill Wednesday that aligns West Virginia's standards for some discharges into the state’s waters with federal limits. Opponents say the bill could put West Virginia’s drinking water supply at risk, but supporters maintain it has the potential to attract new industry to the state.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The House voted on two education-related bills Tuesday – one that would give The West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind access to the School Building Authority and another aimed at giving higher education institutions more control of their own affairs.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill aimed at giving the state’s two largest universities more control over their own affairs advanced in the House of Delegates Monday.

House Bill 2542 is a large bill, 33 pages in fact, with several provisions. But its main intent is to give the state’s higher education institutions more flexibility in hiring and salary rates.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Delegates are beginning to consider bills that would cut some state agencies, no matter how big or how small they are. Members of one committee Friday looked at a bill that would put an end to an agency that receives about $150,000 in annual funding.

House Bill 2646 would get rid of the West Virginia Women’s Commission. It’s a small state agency with just two employees, one of whom works part-time. The House Government Organization Committee considered the bill Friday morning – where its sponsors defended the proposal.

Perry Bennett / WV Legislative Photography

While lawmakers discuss ways to fix the state’s projected budget deficit, a related piece of legislation is beginning to take shape -- the creation of a state earned income tax credit.

An earned income tax credit, or EITC, is an extra lump of cash refunded to low-income, working families every year at tax time. The amount a family receives varies, but it’s based on a person’s income and the number of children in the home, but only working adults qualify. The credit is meant to help struggling families get ahead and many use the extra funds to make major purchases like cars, or large appliances.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

One of the first bills introduced on behalf of Governor Jim Justice is one aimed at organizing the number of state-owned vehicles. The governor’s version of this bill, House Bill 2492, was introduced in the House of Delegates last week and referred to the committee on Government Organization. But lawmakers in that committee took up a different yet similar bill drafted by members in the House.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Members of the Health Committee in the House of Delegates are considering a bill that could potentially create an easier path for new healthcare providers to set up shop in West Virginia.

House Bill 2259 was taken up by the House’s Health Committee Tuesday afternoon. It would allow the West Virginia Healthcare Authority to provide exemptions for Certificates of Need.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Lawmakers in the House have approved a bill that would increase the penalties for littering in the state.

Littering on public or private property in West Virginia is already a misdemeanor, but House Bill 2303 increases the fines and community service hours associated with it.  

Perry Bennett / WV Legislative Photography

Members of the House are considering a bill that changes the way lawmakers report political donations during the legislative session.

House Bill 2319 would require candidates running for legislative offices, or their candidate committees, to disclose any fundraising they do during the legislative session to the Secretary of State’s Office within 5 days of the fundraising event.

Perry Bennett / WV Legislative Photography

During both the 2015 and the 2016 state Legislative sessions, the House of Delegates pushed a bill that would make the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind eligible for funding from the West Virginia School Building Authority, or SBA. In 2015, it was vetoed by then-Governor Tomblin, and in 2016, it never made it out of the Senate’s Finance committee. Now, members in the House are trying once again this year, with House Bill 2123.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The House of Delegates voted on its first bill of the 2017 state Legislative Session Wednesday – one of many ethics bills expected to move through the chamber this year.

House Bill 2006 increases the penalties for someone who violates West Virginia’s Whistle-Blower Law.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Children of all ages from across West Virginia gathered at the Capitol yesterday for the Our Children, Our Future campaign's fourth 'Kids and Families Day.' Created in 2014, the group puts together an annual legislative platform which this year includes 12 policies they think would improve the lives of West Virginia working families. Here's a look at three of those proposals:

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Leaders in West Virginia’s House of Delegates say they plan to strengthen a number of ethics laws in West Virginia this legislative session. The first piece of legislation making its way through that chamber this year is House Bill 2006, increasing penalties for violating the state’s Whistle-Blower Law.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Gov. Jim Justice has asked lawmakers to do a politically unpopular thing this state Legislative session -- raise taxes. But legislative leaders say they are still on the hunt for cuts to state government. Both the House and Senate Finance committees held meetings Thursday and heard from the Governor’s budget team, who attempted to convince lawmakers to see things the governor’s way.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Governor Jim Justice’s State of the State address brought a mixed bag of reactions Wednesday night. And from the majority party, it wasn’t exactly a happy one.

A lot of things were different in Governor Justice’s State of the State address Wednesday. It could be said his speech was unique compared to past governors. For one, he gave his speech out on the floor instead of at the House Clerk’s desk. Two, he used a whiteboard to break down some of the proposals in his speech and even had some volunteers walk in to demonstrate a part of the presentation.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia House and Senate met for the first day of the 2017 regular state Legislative session Wednesday.

 

The first official day of the 83rd West Virginia Legislative session began as House Speaker Tim Armstead and Senate President Mitch Carmichael gaveled in Wednesday.

 

 


Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Hundreds of protesters gathered across the street from the Bavarian Inn in Shepherdstown Thursday morning as the United States Democratic Senators held their annual retreat inside.

On Thursday morning, Harpers Ferry resident Cheryl Kemp joined some 250 people gathered outside the Bavarian Inn in Shepherdstown. She says she came out because she wants the senators to know they have her support.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia’s historic rehabilitation tax credit was put in place to encourage developers and property owners to take some of the state’s crumbling, historic structures and get them back into working order. The credit is also supposed to encourage the creation of local jobs while repurposing the underutilized buildings.

But the state’s tax credit is 10 percent, and a coalition of architects, economic developers, and others say that’s not enough to encourage the community development they’d like to see. That same group is now traveling the state looking for support as they prepare to ask state lawmakers to increase the tax credit.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

With only two days left until Christmas, how many of you are still out looking for that one final gift? Well, there’s lots of ways to find that last present – big superstores, malls, or online – but what about shopping locally?  The West Virginia Small Business Administration says, small, local businesses employ nearly half of all West Virginia workers.

 

Procter and Gamble, Procter & Gamble, P&G, Construction
Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia’s first Procter and Gamble manufacturing site located in Martinsburg has been accepting job applications since October 2015, and now the first employees for the plant have been hired. By 2019, about 700 total employees are expected to be working on the site, but there are plenty of hoops to jump through before production actually begins.

 

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