Joni Deutsch

Host - A Change of Tune, Assistant Producer/Guest Host - Mountain Stage

Joni Deutsch was born and raised in Charleston, West Virginia, and graduated from West Virginia University with a degree in public relations and advertising. After learning the radio ropes at WLUR 91.5 FM in Lexington, Virginia, Joni returned to the Mountain State and joined the West Virginia Public Broadcasting family as the creator and host of the weekly indie/alternative music program A Change of Tune. Her work has been featured on NPR's Morning Edition and NPR Music's Heavy Rotation.

In June 2015, Joni became assistant producer for NPR Music’s live performance radio program Mountain Stage with Larry Groce and host of its #MS2Go podcast. One year later, she became the program’s youngest, not to mention first female, guest host. In addition to her radio production work, Joni also acts as lead coordinator for West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s NPR Generation Listen initiative, successfully connecting young listeners to public radio through engaging events around West Virginia.

When she’s not making radio or pursuing her master’s in strategic communication from American University, she can usually be found at home with a good podcast or new #WVmusic release, a hot cup of tea, and a shaggy Polish Lowland sheepdog by her side. 

Craig Acheson

People ask, “It’s a rock school. How do they graduate from this?” And I always say, “We win (and they graduate) when they go make music, play in bands and go out into the community on their own. That’s when everyone wins.” 

Sarah Taylor

"We need to work to retain young musicians so we can continue to grow the scene from within."

Tyler Evert

"There’s another generation [of blues players] coming up... if the flames are stoked well and kept alive. "

Courtesy of the artist

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting and A Change of Tune, this is 30 Days of #WVmusic, the interview series celebrating the folks who make the West Virginia music scene wild and wonderful.  

And today's interview is with a loud and unapologetically proud pysch-rock outfit out of Huntington, West Virginia. This... is ScroungeHound.

King Nique of Real Ones Entertainment

"I've realized there is no recipe for rap."

The Oberports

"When we get on stage, I feel like that’s where we’re supposed to be… that’s what we’re supposed to be doing."

Shawn Corrigan

"Had we not chosen to be in Morgantown, TeamMate wouldn’t exist."

Brian Blauser

Inspired by trailblazers like Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, and the traditional songs of the ‘50s folk revival, Judy Collins embarked on a career that has lasted more than five decades - and is still going strong. She's joined during her set by respected singer and songwriter Ari Hest. Here they perform, "I Choose Love," from this week's broadcast of Mountain Stage.

Courtesy of the artist

"As an artist, you’re your own product. When all you see is everyone’s best and all you feel is your worst, it can be so defeating and crippling to be stuck in this place of 'Why am I not there yet?'"

Patrick Garvey

"[The Phantom Six] never went away. I’m not one of these guys who can get a record out every two years, but it’s consistent though. I’ve kept doing it for a long time. I don’t plan on stopping."

Jess Keathly

"There is so much killer music that comes out of here, and always has. It’s amazing to join in on the tradition of West Virginia music."

J.R. Smiley

"I like my tunes and melodies to be disarming and my themes to be disturbing. It is my exact intent."

Allie Hughes

"Whenever the music scene overlaps with each other's camps, you start building new relationships with people who wouldn't have had the chance to meet otherwise. It's a win-win for everybody."

Burns Exposures

"People want something tangible, something they can hold, something of substance. This is one of vinyl's greatest strengths."

Michelle Waters

"It’s kind of outrageous to think that the only place credible music business is done is Nashville. People listen to and play music everywhere, so why only do business in Nashville? It doesn’t make sense to me."

Brian Blauser / Mountain Stage

Lovingly referred to as The First Family of the Banjo, partners in love, life and music Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn return to the Mountain Stage for an extended set on this week's broadcast.

Courtesy of the artist

"It’s fun to see how we can use the [WVU School of Music] techniques we spent so many years perfecting for something completely different. It’s interesting to show people what you can do with classical music."

Rebekah Call

"The space around you, the space between notes, the space between people in a relationship… that’s all explorable. The chords aren’t as powerful without the space in-between."

Courtesy of the artist

"All-ages punk music scenes were my gateway into this whole thing."

Ginger Willis

"Expect to lose money, but don't let it deter you. If you are just starting out, don't expect some big pay day. You will pay out more than you take in."

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