Glynis Board

Reporter/Producer

Glynis Board hails from the northern panhandle of West Virginia. She’s now based in Morgantown where she’s been reporting for West Virginia Public Broadcasting since 2012. She covers a broad range of topics including arts and culture, women’s issues, and developments in the oil and gas industry. She’s also especially interested in covering news from the northern panhandle where she grew up.

Before reporting the news, Glynis worked in the production department at WV PBS since 2004, contributing with video editing and film making skills to such documentaries as Frank Kearns: American Correspondent, The Last Mission: Establishing the Rule of Law in Iraq, and Ken Hechler: In Pursuit of Justice.

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Glynis Board / WVPB

When natural gas drillers use extreme pressures to drill and crack rocks thousands of feet underground - when they frack for natural gas, for example - sometimes nearby conventional gas wells will suddenly see production double, or triple. 

Local Food Local Places working group of representatives from federal, regional, state, and local organizations tour Wheeling.
Glynis Board / WVPB

Momentum continues to mount behind local food and local economic development efforts in the Northern panhandle. Wheeling was one of the top picks in a national Local Foods, Local Places Competition. As a result, local organizations are receiving technical assistance from multiple state and federal agencies to help capitalize on the growing demand for local foods.  Meetings with federal agency representatives began last week.


50 years ago this month, in March of 1965, armed policemen attacked peaceful civil rights demonstrators attempting to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. The incident became known as Bloody Sunday. 17 marchers were hospitalized and 50 more were treated for injuries.

An African American artist, Jacob Lawrence, depicted a scene on the bridge. That work of art is among the pieces being gifted to West Virginia University’s new art museum in Morgantown.


U.S. Senator Shelley Moore Capito, Chair of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee’s Clean Air and Nuclear Safety Subcommittee, held a field hearing this week in Beckley, regarding the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan. The carbon pollution standards are the first of their kind and aim is to reduce carbon emissions 30 percent nationwide by reducing carbon pollution from power plants. Senator Capito held a hearing in southern West Virginia where tightening regulations might be felt most acutely.


Cecelia Mason

Both of West Virginia’s Senators, Democrat Joe Manchin and Republican Shelley Moore Capito, are co-sponsors of a piece of legislation that would rewrite the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act. 

  The federal Environmental Protection Agency’s public comment period on proposed stricter ozone standards closes this week. Many health and medical professionals across the country are urging the EPA to adopt the standard. Meanwhile, West Virginia’s senator Joe Manchin introduced legislation that would block the measure.


West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey
West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey / West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection hosted a public hearing in Charleston to discuss a new air quality permit for natural gas facilities in the state. Some wish the DEP would use the permit writing process to incorporate suggestions from scientists who have studied air around gas facilities.


Department of Environmental Protection, DEP
Department of Environmental Protection

  The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection announced that a public hearing twice delayed because of bad weather is now scheduled for April 21,  from 6 to 8 p.m. at Oak Hill High School, located at 350 West Oyler Avenue in Fayette County.

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March 14, 2015 2:17 p.m. 

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection reported in an email that conditions at the Hughes Creek area mine stabilized Saturday afternoon. The DEP says, "... there is nothing to indicate an imminent threat" and residents could return to their homes. About 54 people had sheltered at Riverside High School on Friday night. DEP officials were concerned that the mine could fail.

  The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection is reporting that residents in the Hughes Creek community are being called to evacuate "out of an abundance of caution." A possible mine blowout above U.S. Route 60 could prevent emergency services from being able to access the community  in eastern Kanawah County.

Cecelia Mason

Senator Shelley Moore-Capito joined with 46 other senators this month in signing an open letter to the Islamic Republic of Iran. In a news conference earlier this week, Capito commented on the action calling the letter "straight forward," and not a significant move.

Bill Hughes

  A bill to roll back regulations of storage tanks is making its way through the legislature. This week the House Judiciary Committee passed a version of Senate Bill 423 by a narrow vote of 13 to 12 without making any significant changes to the proposed legislation.


  West Liberty University announced this week that President Robin Capehart submitted a letter of resignation which was accepted by the university's Board of Governors. 

By File:We_Can_Do_It!.jpg: J. Howard Miller, artist employed by Westinghouse, poster used by the War Production Co-ordinating Committee derivative work: Tom Morris (This file was derived from: We Can Do It!.jpg:) [Public domain] / Wikimedia Commons

Where Are All the Women? Wikipedia’s Gender Gap” That’s the name of a panel discussion that will be hosted at West Virginia University. 


U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey says more data and research are necessary to best understand the potential risks to water quality in areas with unconventional oil and gas development.

January 2nd of 2014 the Lisby Pad explosion spilled an unknown amount of "black sludge" associated with a horizontal drilling site in Tyler County into a feeder stream of a local municipality's source water stream.
Bill Hughes

 

State senators in Charleston took action this week to roll back aboveground tank regulations put in place after last year’s chemical spill which contaminated water for hundreds of thousands of West Virginians.

Adam Zyglis / The Buffalo News

  A new report released in the wake of New York State's decision to ban the horizontal gas drilling process known as fracking analyzes more than 100 scientific studies that have been approved and distributed by oil and gas industry representatives.


  When you hear the word “ginseng” you might think about a wild plant that grows in the hills of Appalachia … and you would be right, that’s the good stuff. But there’s another way ginseng grows that’s a little less wild. Basically, we’re talking about ginseng farming in the forest, which can yield roots as valuable as the wild stuff. So is it a viable business for West Virginians? Well, there are some rules and regulations that might be hindering growth, but experts say there are ways to promote the industry.


 The War on Coal, pressures from natural gas development, crumbling infrastructure, whatever you want to blame it on - jobs are becoming more and more scarce these days in communities dependent on coal. As a result, some folks are reaching back to their roots, literally and figuratively, to make ends meet - just as they have for generations. And there’s some big money there. Especially harvesting ginseng. But can plants like ginseng play a significant role in our economy today? Enquiring minds would like to know…


Roxy Todd

During January’s West Virginia Board of Education meeting, the Board voted to withdraw a controversial new policy that addresses how science teachers should teach climate change to public school students.

Folks have until 4:00 pm Tuesday February 17th, to weigh in on this new policy.

  “Climate Change and Population Health” was the title of a recent discussion at West Virginia University. Three panelists, a social scientist, an entomologist, and a public health expert turned over research and health concerns related to that research on climate change - or as the discussion moderator, Interim Chair of the Department of Health Policy, Management, and Leadership in the WVU School of Public Health, Robert Duval, was more apt to call it: Climate Disruption.


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