Glynis Board

Northen Panhandle Bureau Chief

Glynis Board hails from the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia and is based in Wheeling at the First State Capital Building. She’s been reporting for West Virginia Public Broadcasting since 2012. She covers a broad range of topics including arts and culture, women’s issues, and developments in the oil and gas industry, as well as a variety of significant happening in northern West Virginia.

Before reporting the news, Glynis worked in the production department at WV PBS since 2004, contributing with video editing and film making skills to such documentaries as Frank Kearns: American Correspondent, The Last Mission: Establishing the Rule of Law in Iraq, and Ken Hechler: In Pursuit of Justice.

Ways to Connect

Prison Bars
Schavda / wikimedia Commons

In the U.S., for every 100,000 people, 710 will be incarcerated - that’s more than twice the rate of incarceration in any other developed country. And certain demographics fare significantly worse than others.

But social disparities aside, it’s prison overcrowding that is motivating changes in the justice system. Thousands of federal inmates across the country are seeing reduced sentences in light of new guidelines for non-violent drug offenders. U.S. Attorney William J. Ihlenfeld spoke about the implications and challenges here in West Virginia.

Dollar Photo Club

West Virginia Women Work is an organization that wants to help women in the state achieve economic self-sufficiency. They’ve been at it for 15 years. About 1000 women are better for it, so far. But the organization runs on a shoestring budget, with only five full-time staff to organize six 11-week courses each year. It’s now looking to the state to stay afloat.


Gabrielle Marshall

A group of students from the University of Notre Dame just came to West Virginia for fall break. Instead of relaxing with friends, as many college students do, these guys got a taste of life in a food desert.

West Liberty University

West Liberty University announced the selection of a new president this week. Dr. Stephen Greiner is currently the president of Hazard Community and Technical College in Kentucky, but he will take over as president at West Liberty in January.


Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Appalachian Institute at Wheeling Jesuit University hosted a panel discussion this week about the federal Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan. The new rule seeks to reduce carbon emissions in the US by 37 percent by 2030 as compared to 2005 levels.


Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia’s Department of Environmental Protection is calling for thoughts and data that will help determine how the state can meet federal goals to reduce carbon emissions.


courtesy of Mike Breiding

Researchers at West Virginia University are looking for clues about West Virginia's climate history -- by combing through old journals of naturalists who spent time in the state's forests and hills.


Wikimedia Commons

State, county and city officials, as well as community members and stakeholders gathered this week in Wheeling at the Wesbanco Arena, home Wheeling’s minor league ice hockey team, The Nailers. Officials met to see how renovations of the arena are coming along. So far: all new seats, new video screens, and new food vendors.


Drill cuttings dumped at WV landfill.
Bill Hughes

There are lots of federal regulations governing what businesses can legally dump into water, the ground, or release into the air. But the gas industry is getting around a lot of those regulations. The oil and gas industry enjoys exemptions from seven federal laws, including one that is supposed to protect human health from the hazards of waste disposal. Other states have passed their own laws regulating this waste to compensate. But it’s a looser system in West Virginia.

Today Concord University is celebrating a new broadcasting facility on its campus. West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Jessica Lilly, a Concord graduate who teaches at the university, spearheaded efforts to get a college radio station up and running.

Perhaps not surprisingly, West Virginia’s poet laureate, Marc Harshman, seems to thinks so.

He’s been collaborating with several organizations, including West Virginia Public Broadcasting, to conceive of new events that will bring more poetry to the daily lives of West Virginians.


Glynis Board / WVPB

This week half a dozen Catholic nuns arrived on a bus in Wheeling. The women are part of NETWORK, a National Catholic Social Justice Lobby, which educates, organizes, and lobbies for economic and social transformation. The Catholic Sisters visited shelters, schools, food pantries, and citizens, in Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Indiana, Ohio, and finally, West Virginia as they made their way to Washington DC. The tour is in response to Pope Francis’s call to transform politics and the economy.


Chiselbox.com

Matt Welsch, also known as the Vagabond Chef, has traveled all over the world experiencing culinary arts and food. You can find a taste of those travels at his restaurant, the Vagabond Kitchen, in Wheeling. Welsch recently took a 10-day motorcycle trip across the state of West Virginia. Over the course of 1500 miles, and throughout 39 counties, Welsch's objective was to connect and find other West Virginians who are passionate about cuisine, spirits, and celebrating the Mountain State in general.  The Vagabond Chef calls the trip “a true immersion experience.”


Drill cuttings dumped at WV landfill.
Bill Hughes

In the growing wake of the natural gas boom, West Virginia has been trying to figure out what exactly to do with waste generated by the oil and gas industry. 

artwork by Beth Crowder

This week plans for a new, almost $300 million wastewater facility were shared for the first time with community members in Doddridge County. Antero Resources announced intentions earlier this summer to build the facility, which will process and recycle wastewater produced from its natural gas drilling operations in the region.


Dollar Photo Club

U.S. District Attorney William J. Ihlenfeld, II, just announced the launch of an organized effort to combat addiction problems in Marion, Monongalia and Harrison counties: an Addiction Action Plan. It’s an extension of an initiative that began in the Northern Panhandle late last year in response to a resurgence of heroin use in the region.


Dollar Photo Club

U.S. District Attorney J. William Ihlendfeld II will be discussing the latest efforts to come from his office to combat the addiction epidemic in West Virginia. Ihlenfeld’s office is expanding his established Addiction Action Plan from the northern panhandle into Monongalia, Marion, and Harrison counties.

Ethan Wells

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources' Bureau for Public Health issued a Public Health Advisory in response to the blue-green algae blooms in the Ohio River and in some of its tributaries.


Tower for drilling horizontally into the Marcellus Shale Formation for natural gas, from Pennsylvania Route 118 in eastern Moreland Township, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, USA
Ruhrfisch [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)

Eminent domain is when a government entity takes over private property for public use. A piece of legislation is forming that would essentially allow that to happen in the northern gas fields of West Virginia. Only the government entity is allowing private industry to take over property, which is in gas form, 6,000 feet below the surface. And it won’t benefit the public directly, unless you count severance taxes.

“The Teflon Toxin” is the title of a series of three investigative reports that surfaced this month. The series examines the 70-year history of DuPont and the no-stick chemical called C8 used to coat Teflon pans and other products.

A decade ago it came to light that DuPont contaminated water sources in West Virginia and Ohio with the chemical, and soon after that the chemical is toxic. The use of the C8 was phased out of production this year at DuPont’s Washington Works plant just outside Parkersburg. But this September, the first of about 3,500 personal injury claims is coming to trial.

That’s one reason the investigative series was just published.

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