Glynis Board

Northen Panhandle Bureau Chief

Glynis Board hails from the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia and is based in Wheeling at the First State Capital Building. She’s been reporting for West Virginia Public Broadcasting since 2012. She covers a broad range of topics including arts and culture, women’s issues, and developments in the oil and gas industry, as well as a variety of significant happening in northern West Virginia.

Before reporting the news, Glynis worked in the production department at WV PBS since 2004, contributing with video editing and film making skills to such documentaries as Frank Kearns: American Correspondent, The Last Mission: Establishing the Rule of Law in Iraq, and Ken Hechler: In Pursuit of Justice.

Ways to Connect

Underground Mine, Miners, Mining
Robert PEnergy / wikimedia commons

Lawmakers in both Kentucky and West Virginia are working to loosen mine safety regulations, alarming some mine safety experts.

Kentucky lawmakers passed a bill that reduces the number of underground mine inspections. Similar legislation is pending in West Virginia’s Senate but with more substantial changes. Under that bill, the state’s mining inspection system would move from enforcement to a “compliance assistance” program.

Chuck Kleine / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In the year 2017, recycling programs exist in several communities in West Virginia, but these programs have not significantly changed the state’s habit of burying trash in the hills. West Virginians are sending about the same amount of trash to the state’s 18 landfills as they have for decades.  

In 1989, West Virginia lawmakers passed a bill that’s goal was to reduce residential waste going to landfills by 50 percent by 2010. The bill was necessary to meet federal requirements. According to data collected by the state over the years - West Virginia hasn’t yet made any progress toward that goal.

Austin Caperton, Secretary of West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection.
Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Sierra Club hosted a public forum this week featuring newly appointed Cabinet Secretary of West Virginia's Department of Environmental Protection, Austin Caperton. It was among his first public speaking events as secretary. 

Glynisi Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Some residents from the Northern Panhandle region organized a protest outside Wheeling municipal offices this week. They want city council to consider declaring the town a "sanctuary city" which is a "municipality that adopts a policy of protecting unauthorized immigrants by not prosecuting them for violating federal immigration laws and by ensuring that all residents have access to city services, regardless of immigration status."


While surrounded by coal-state lawmakers and coal miners, President Trump signed a bill this week that rolls back an environmental rule designed to protect streams from coal mining debris.


The chemical giant DuPont made an offer Monday to pay more than half-a-billion dollars to settle water contamination lawsuits pending in federal court.


Energy Transfer

A federal agency has approved construction plans for one of the major natural gas pipelines planned in the region. The 4.2 billion dollar Rover pipeline project is slated to begin phase one of construction this year.


The creek where the WVU Stream Lab team dropped their sensors. Save the Tygart Watershed Association has been keeping tabs on the waterway since before the coal slurry pond was installed nearby.
Colleen S. Good / WVU Stream Lab Project

Republicans in Washington are making good on promises to overrule a regulation from the Obama Administration with support of West Virginia’s delegation. The rule was designed to protect streams from coal mining debris.

Patrick Ford (in red) and Assistant Director Marvin Six of the Brooke-Hancock Business Development Corporation at the abandoned and contaminated pottery plant in 2012.
Photo courtesy of Patrick Ford

One of the Trump Administration’s first moves once in office was to freeze all grants issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. That move raised a lot of questions and a further directive limiting public statements from the EPA added to the confusion.

Department of Environmental Protection, DEP
Department of Environmental Protection

The new head of the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection fired two workers responsible for interacting with the public.

Chief communications director Kelley Gillenwater as well as environmental advocate Wendy Radcliff were both fired at the DEP. Radcliff’s role was largely to facilitate any problems or concerns between communities and the agency. Both positions are mandated by state law.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin was enthusiastic in his support of President-elect Donald Trump's pick to lead the U.S. Department of Energy. During his Senate confirmation hearing today on Capitol Hill, Rick Perry said his views of the agency have changed.


Ann W. Olson

Host Marc Harshman calls her, “the most ‘can-do-anything’ poet in America.” George Ella Lyon is a novelist, essayist, teacher, activist, musician, lyricist, children’s author, playwright, and poet. She was named poet laureate of Kentucky in 2015.

Cliff Owen / AP Photo

President-elect Donald Trump’s choice to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt faced questions from Senators in his confirmation hearing Wednesday.

AP images

Two nominees for the new administration who could have a lot of influence in our region will be on Capitol Hill this week.  President-elect Donald Trump’s choices for secretary of commerce and the  Environmental Protection Agency both have confirmation hearings in the Senate.

Aaron Schackelford / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The billionaire Wilbur Ross is headed for Senate confirmation hearings as President-elect Donald Trump’s choice for Secretary of Commerce. Ross made it to ultra-rich status in part by salvaging coal and steel assets in Appalachia and the Rust Belt. His business dealings leave a mixed legacy in the Ohio Valley region, from rescued steel mills to the site of a searing workplace disaster, and raise questions about the leadership he would bring to the president’s cabinet.  

 

Three New Developments to Watch Along the Ohio River

Jan 13, 2017

Cities and towns all along the Ohio River are pushing to reinvent their economies. And they’re turning to everything from recreation to new industry to do it. Here are three new developments we’re watching from Pennsylvania to West Virginia.

1. Shell’s Ethane Cracker

Kara Lofton

As towns large and small along the Ohio River struggle to rebuild their economies, many are trying to attract more industry. But some places are realizing that embracing the recreational side of their riverfronts can also be a key engine for growth.

Business has been picking up in recent years for Tim Reddinger, who owns a bait shop in Bridgewater, just north of Pittsburgh, along the Ohio River.

“Can you see that right there?” Reddinger asks, pointing from the bank to a nearby eddy in the river. “Those are baby shad—probably not a couple months old.”

Glynis Board

A federal court in Ohio delivered a verdict this week awarding $10.5 million in punitive damages to a man with testicular cancer who, for years, was exposed through drinking water to the toxic chemicals DuPont used to make Teflon.

Rebecca Kiger

Can a photograph help a community grow? One photographer is shedding some light on ongoing efforts in a region looking for some new ways to sustain itself.

DuPont's Washington Works
Parkersburg News & Sentinel

The third case of some 3500 against the chemical company DuPont reached an initial verdict today. The case stems from the company’s widespread water contamination with a chemical known as C8.


Pages