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The Two-Way
3:01 pm
Sun February 1, 2015

Seahawks, Patriots, Face Off For Super Bowl XLIX

Seattle Seahawks fans Mesina LaFleur, 31, (L-R), Brandi McAtee, 31, and Tomara Krieger, 31, display their feet at the stadium in Phoenix, Arizona on Sunday.
Lucy Nicholson Reuters/Landov

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Environment
11:39 am
Sun February 1, 2015

The Icebergs Are Talking. We Just Have To Listen.

Giant chunks of ice break away from the Hans Glacier in Svalbard, Norway, in 2013.
Courtesy Oskar Glowacki

If a glacier cracks and nobody hears it, does it still make a sound?

"Oh, they moan and they groan," says Grant Deane, a researcher at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. "They crackle and rumble and fizz, and they have all kinds of amazing sounds that they make."

Deane is one of the authors of a new study that interprets the acoustics of glacial melting.

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Middle East
11:06 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Egypt Frees One Al Jazeera Journalist From Prison

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sunday Puzzle
8:03 am
Sun February 1, 2015

The Ol' Puzzle Switcheroo

Sunday Puzzle
NPR

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a made-up two-word phrase, where the second and third letters of the first word are switched to get the second word. Example: Serene bivalve would be calm clam

Last week's challenge: This challenge came from listener Ben Bass of Chicago. Name someone who welcomes you in. Insert the letter U somewhere inside this, and you'll name something that warns you to stay away. Who is this person, and what is this thing?

Answer: Bell boy, bell buoy.

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Author Interviews
7:57 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Are Danes Really That Happy? The Myth Of The Scandinavian Utopia

A view of Oslo, Norway, taken from the surrounding hills. Author Michael Booth says Norwegians were traditionally thought of as Scandinavia's "country bumpkin."
Lise Aaserud AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

What comes to mind when you think of Scandinavia? Great education systems? The world's happiest people? Healthy work-life balance?

One man, a British transplant living in Denmark, sought to set the record straight about his adoptive homeland.

Michael Booth is the author of a new book, The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. He spoke to NPR's Rachel Martin about the real definition of that word utopia.

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Strange News
7:56 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Seven Short Seconds Between A Canadian And Lottery Riches

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Parallels
7:56 am
Sun February 1, 2015

In Sweden, Remote-Control Airport Is A Reality

The tiny town of Sundsvall, Sweden, is home to the world's first airport to land passenger planes by remote control. The cameras used to help the air traffic controllers guide airplanes render details as small as cars pulling into the parking lot from miles away.
Rich Preston NPR

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

As our plane touches down in Sundsvall, Sweden, the horizon is all snow and ice. A small air traffic control tower sticks out above the white horizon.

But this airport actually has two air traffic control centers. The second one is just a short walk from the airport runway.

Inside a ground-floor, windowless room, there's a display that looks exactly like what you'd see out of an air traffic control tower. You can see the snowy runway, you can see the trees, you can even see a car pulling into the airport parking lot.

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Shots - Health News
7:56 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Family Struggles With Father's Wish To Die

Robert Schwimmer, 66, and his son Scott Schwimmer, 21, spoke with NPR about Robert's wish to hasten his death under certain circumstances. Here — as in the family photo above — they're in Kauai, Hawaii, on the family's "last big trip" after Robert received a 6-month prognosis in October.
Courtesy Scott Schwimmer

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

When 66-year-old Robert Schwimmer was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2013, he didn't take it all that seriously. His doctors told him it was "operable," and that was the only word he seemed to hear.

Now he's in hospice care and, as he tells NPR's Rachel Martin, he accepts that he's no longer trying to prolong life, but rather living out what's left of it.

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Middle East
7:56 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Jordan Waits On Fate Of Its ISIS Prisoner

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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National Security
7:56 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Ex-Agent: Secret Service Management Should Be More Proactive

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:07 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
7:56 am
Sun February 1, 2015

Democrat Seeks To Authorize Operations Against ISIS

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Europe
7:38 am
Sun February 1, 2015

As In Greece, Voters In Spain Appear Ready To Oust Conservatives

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Education
5:52 am
Sun February 1, 2015

A Crossroads At The End Of College: Introducing 'The Howard Project'

Howard University students (left to right) Kevin Peterman, Taylor Davis, Leighton Watson and Ariel Alford are the subjects of NPR's Project Howard. They'll be keeping audio diaries as they finish their final semester of college and look toward their futures.
Robb Hill for NPR

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 11:39 am

If you know any college seniors, now might be a good time to send them some encouraging words. The class of 2015 can't be blamed if they're feeling a little worried: They're facing one of the most important transitions of their lives.

In a matter of months, they're about to launch from the relatively protected confines of college into the so-called "real world," where they have to find a sense of purpose — not to mention a paycheck. It's not hyperbole to say the decisions they make now will shape the rest of their lives.

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The Two-Way
5:50 am
Sun February 1, 2015

At Long Last: It's Super Sunday

Football pundits say could be one of the closest, most exciting championship games ever.
Charlie Riedel AP

Are you ready for 17 and a half minutes of football???!!!!

That, according to a study by the Media Education Foundation, is how much live football action there was in last year's Super Bowl. And pretty much what we can expect Sunday when the New England Patriots take on the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl 49.

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The Salt
5:44 am
Sun February 1, 2015

College Life Doesn't Have To Mean Crummy Cuisine, Says Dorm Room Chef

No oven necessary: Hu makes her pumpkin cake in the microwave.
Courtesy of Emily Hu

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 2:07 pm

Emily Hu is a veritable master chef of the dorm room.

No oven? No problem. The college student is skilled at navigating the cooking limitations of campus living — she can whip up cakes with just four ingredients and a microwave, and make muffins in a toaster oven.

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Author Interviews
6:30 pm
Sat January 31, 2015

Impressions From The Ice: A Poet Returns From Antarctica

Last year, a poet arrived at the end of the earth: Jynne Dilling Martin spent six weeks, funded by the National Science Foundation, living in Antarctica.

She spent the summer (winter, to those of us in the Northern Hemisphere) shadowing scientists as they went about their work, and writing about the people who call the icy continent home.

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The Salt
6:30 pm
Sat January 31, 2015

Surströmming Revisited: Eating Sweden's Famously Stinky Fish

Surströmming, a fermented herring considered to be a famous delicacy in Sweden, is also known as one of the most pungent foods in the world.
Pauline Conradsson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 31, 2015 6:55 pm

More than a decade ago, NPR's Ari Shapiro attempted to eat a fermented Swedish herring called surströmming, one of the most pungent foods in the world. It did not go well. Twelve years later, on a reporting trip to Sweden, Ari decided it was time to face his fears and try the fish again.

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Movie Interviews
5:34 pm
Sat January 31, 2015

Former Basketball Player Scores As A Filmmaker

Director Deon Taylor takes questions at a special screening of his new film, Supremacy, in Los Angeles.
Eric Charbonneau Le Studio Photography

Originally published on Sat January 31, 2015 6:30 pm

For most of his life, Deon Taylor was all about basketball. "Ever since I can remember I've just been in love with the game," he says.

His basketball career brought him a college scholarship and took him overseas, where he played professionally. Then he pivoted: in 2002, he gave up an athletic career to become a filmmaker.

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Goats and Soda
5:19 pm
Sat January 31, 2015

Mindy Kaling's Super Bowl Ad: Are Indian Women Invisible?

After years of being treated like she's not there, Mindy Kaling realizes she just might be invisible.
via YouTube

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 10:03 am

A Super Bowl commercial for Nationwide Insurance shows an Indian-American woman — none other than author and actor Mindy Kaling — trying to hail a cab in New York City. And it's not easy.

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Around the Nation
5:05 pm
Sat January 31, 2015

DEA Using License Plate Readers To Spy On Drivers

Originally published on Sat January 31, 2015 9:35 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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