NPR News

Pages

Code Switch
6:38 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Before Rosa Parks, A Teenager Defied Segregation On An Alabama Bus

"I knew why they chose Rosa" Parks instead of her as a symbol of the civil rights movement, Colvin says. "They thought I would be too militant for them."
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 7:45 pm

Rosa Parks is well-known for her refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on a public bus in Montgomery, Ala., in December 1955. But Parks' civil rights protest did have a precedent: Fifteen-year-old Claudette Colvin, a student from a black high school in Montgomery, had refused to move from her bus seat nine months earlier. However, Colvin is not nearly as well-known, and certainly not as celebrated, as Parks.

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:50 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Walk A Little Faster To Get The Most Out of Your Exercise Time

Government guidelines say exercising 2.5 hours a week will keep you healthy, but a study says you can get the job done in less time if you rev it up.
iStockphoto

Some people — who are they? — have no problem fitting regular aerobic exercise into their lives. The rest of us want to know how much we have to exercise to see health benefits. Now we have some answers: You may want to go just a tad longer and harder than you'd thought.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:42 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

With Much Controversy, Boston Begins Removing Parking Space Savers

A fashion doll in a milk crate saves a parking space on a residential street in South Boston.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 6:06 pm

The near-record amount of snow that has fallen on Boston this winter is testing one of the city's great traditions: On orders from Mayor Martin J. Walsh, the Public Works Department began removing parking space savers from city streets on Monday.

In the past, the informal rule has been that whoever takes the time to dig out a parking space gets to keep it for 48 hours. But this year, the city has gotten about 100 inches of snow and those 48 hours have turned into weeks.

Read more
The Salt
5:30 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Sandwich Monday: The Funnel Cake Corn Dog

Like five fat, delicious fingers.
NPR

When the corn dog was discovered in an Iowa cave in the 1950s, explorers dated it at roughly 40,000 years old. Its recipe has gone largely unchanged since then, though few makers use real glyptodon meat anymore.

Recently, though, the dog has had an evolutionary transformation. There's now a State Fair Brand Funnel Cake Corn Dog, a turkey and pork hot dog wrapped in a sweet funnel cake batter.

Eva: Time to reinforce the roller coaster.

Read more
All Tech Considered
5:25 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Free Wi-Fi On Buses Offers A Link To Future Of 'Smart Cities'

More than 600 Porto city buses and taxis have been fitted with routers to provide free Wi-Fi service. It's being touted as the biggest Wi-Fi-in-motion network in the world.
Sérgio Rodrigues Veniam

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 6:38 pm

Board any city bus in Portugal's second-largest municipality, Porto, and you've got free Wi-Fi. More than 600 city buses and taxis have been fitted with wireless routers, creating what's touted as the biggest Wi-Fi-in-motion network in the world.

Read more
World Cafe
5:13 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

World Cafe Next: Nora Jane Struthers And The Party Line

Nora Jane Struthers And The Party Line.
Todd Roeth Courtesy of the artist

Today's World Cafe: Next artist is Nora Jane Struthers And The Party Line, which just released a new album called Wake. It's Struthers' third record in a career that finds her transitioning from bluegrass roots to a sound that encompasses pop and country. Hear and download two of Struthers' songs on this page.

World Cafe
5:00 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

World Cafe: The Music Of 'Orange Is The New Black'

The musicians of Orange Is The New Black.
Rich McKie WXPN

The scoring of TV shows is not all done in a big studio with giant monitors and orchestras. For example, the music in Orange Is The New Black gets made in a tiny, cramped garage behind a home in Altadena. There, Gwendolyn Sanford, Scott Doherty and Brandon Jay toil for long hours, collaborating with the producers in pursuit of the right sound to complement what's on the screen.

In this segment, they're joined by Ben Vaughn, whose twangy surf guitar proved to be the right sound for a show about aliens living on earth: Third Rock From The Sun.

Read more
Parallels
4:58 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Britain's Muslims Still Feel The Need To Explain Themselves

Members of the Muslim community leave the East London Mosque after prayers before the start of the holy month of Ramadan in June 2014. The mosque has an estimated 7,000 worshippers.
Rob Stothard Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 7:19 pm

Jihadi John, runaway schoolgirls, no-go zones: the headlines are everywhere in Great Britain.

If you are Muslim in Britain, you can't get away from them. If you're Salman Farsi, you're often at the center of it.

Read more
World Cafe
4:52 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Rhiannon Giddens On World Cafe

Rhiannon Giddens.
Dan Winters Courtesy of the artist

World Cafe's guest today is Rhiannon Giddens — formerly of Carolina Chocolate Drops, whose album Genuine Negro Jig won a Grammy in 2010. That record provided an introduction to the way she makes a song her own. (In that case, it was a dynamite cover of Blu Cantrell's "Hit Em Up Style.") Giddens has done more solo work — she was a show-stopper in the film of the Another Day, Another Time concert, as she sang a Gaelic song — and performs in the folk supergroup The New Basement Tapes.

Read more
Goats and Soda
4:51 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

How 'Flower Beds' Give Love And Lentils To Moms And Babies

Mina, a 22-year-old mother in Jamkani, Chhattisgarh, says sending her child to the Fulwari gives her more time to farm and collect forest wood.
Ankita Rao for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 8:09 pm

Chhattisgarh is one of the world's worst places to raise a baby, let alone be one. The state in central India has some of the worst health indicators in the country, including sky-high child mortality and extreme malnutrition.

For decades, aid organizations tried to improve the health of moms and babies in Chhattisgarh. Little made a dent. But then a garden of flowers rose up in the state.

Read more
Law
4:41 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Supreme Court Seems Divided Over Independent Redistricting Commissions

Arizona commission attorney Mary O'Grady (left) and Stephen Miller, a city council member, point to a possible redistricted map in 2011.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 6:38 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court seemed closely divided Monday as it heard arguments testing how far states may go to prevent political parties from drawing congressional district lines to maximize partisan advantage.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:37 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

L.A.'s Skid Row Tense After Fatal Police Shooting Of Homeless Man

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 6:38 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
Politics
4:23 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Sen. Mikulski, 'Ground-Breaker' For Women Legislators, Won't Seek Re-Election

Mikulski, left, and her then-opponent Linda Chavez hold hands before the Maryland Senate candidates debate in 1986.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 1:18 am

A surprise political announcement Monday — the longest-serving woman in Congress, Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, said she will not seek re-election next year. Mikulski was first elected to the House in 1976, and 10 years later, was elected to the Senate.

Read more
Science
4:23 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Science-Based Artist Gives Celebrity Tortoise A Second Life

Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 6:38 pm

George Dante fell in love with taxidermy as a young child. His parents took him to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, and he couldn't tear his eyes away from the dioramas in the Hall of African Mammals.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:22 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Judge Reduces Sentences For Amish Involved In Beard-Cutting Attacks

Sam Mullet stands in the front yard of his home in Bergholz, Ohio, in 2011. Mullet has now been sentenced to serve 10 years and nine months in jail.
Amy Sancetta AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 5:09 pm

A federal judge in Cleveland has reduced the sentences of 16 Amish men and women who were convicted of cutting the beards and hair of their detractors.

If you remember, an appeals court threw out their hate-crime convictions last summer, saying the attacks were fueled by "interpersonal and intra-family disagreements, not the victims' religious beliefs."

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:34 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Can Family Secrets Make You Sick?

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 7:32 pm

In the 1980s, Dr. Vincent Felitti, now director of the California Institute of Preventive Medicine in San Diego, discovered something potentially revolutionary about the ripple effects of child sexual abuse. He discovered it while trying to solve a very different health problem: helping severely obese people lose weight.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Task Force Calls For Independent Probes Of Police-Involved Shootings

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 6:38 pm

Law enforcement agencies should measure community trust the same way they monitor crime rates. That's among the recommendations of a task force established after police-involved killings of unarmed black people in Ferguson, Mo., in Cleveland and on Staten Island, N.Y.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:18 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Take The ACE Quiz — And Learn What It Does And Doesn't Mean

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Source: CDC

An ACE score is a tally of different types of abuse, neglect, and other hallmarks of a rough childhood. According to the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, the rougher your childhood, the higher your score is likely to be, and the higher your risk for later health problems. You can take the test below:

So, you've got your score. Now what?

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:18 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Tinder's Premium Dating App Will Cost You More If You're Older

Tinder is launching Tinder Plus, a new version of its app with added features including the ability to have another look at a potential match you swiped away.
Tinder

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 6:39 pm

Tinder, the immensely popular dating app that lets users pick a potential match with just the swipe of a finger, launched a paid version this week in 140 countries. But there's a catch: Your age will determine how much you pay.

Tinder told NPR that U.S. users will pay $9.99 for Tinder Plus if they're under 30, and $19.99 per month if they're 30 or older. U.K. users between the ages of 18 and 27 will be charged 3.99 pounds per month, and users 28 and older will be charged 14.99 pounds per month.

Read more
The Salt
3:10 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Your Grandparents Spent More Of Their Money On Food Than You Do

In 2013, Americans on average spent 5.6 percent of their disposable personal incomes on food they consumed at home.
April L. Brown ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 6:56 pm

When admiring such enticing items at the grocery store as an avocado for $1.50, an $8 chocolate bar or fresh wild Alaskan salmon for $20 a pound, you've probably experienced sticker shock.

Indeed, retailers and restaurants offer myriad opportunities to blow your food budget in one fell swoop.

Read more

Pages