News

West Virginia Public Broadcasting

If you’ve been paying attention to our news output here at West Virginia Public Broadcasting as of late, you’ve probably noticed an increased focus on data and digital journalism. Sure, we tell stories on the radio, but emerging technology and innovations have inspired us to present our stories in a new and interesting way.

As part of The Needle and the Damage Done, we wanted to allow our audience to get a better understanding of West Virginia’s heroin problem.

The 3,000-pound drop forge (the biggest in the factory) in full downward plunge onto a piece of steal as it's pounded into a new reality.
Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In an age of globalization and a shrinking manufacturing sector, two young men in Wheeling are hedging their bets and running with a business idea that first took off in 1854. Hand-forged tools actually took off much earlier, but Warwood Tool has been in the tool-forging business for over 160 years now: hammers, crow-bars, pick-axes, you name it.


WNYC

As host and executive producer of the hit podcast "Death, Sex & Money" from WNYC, Anna Sale asks famous people and regular folks about the things we need to talk more about, but don't.

On this week's "The Front Porch," Sale talks about her complicated love of West Virginia, and the bittersweet experience of visiting home, once you know you're gone for good.

  Seemingly everyone in West Virginia has been affected by the heroin epidemic in the state. There are addicts themselves, family members struggling to find them help, the doctors, nurses and paramedics on the front lines trying to save lives and lawmakers and law enforcement officials trying to put a stop to it all--no one seems to be spared.

Hillary's new LinkedIn résumé

May 21, 2015
Tim Fitzsimons

Hillary Clinton is not the first person to get on LinkedIn — about 115 million Americans joined before her.  Nor is she the first 2016 contender. Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz, and others already have profiles there.

"The difference between Hillary Clinton and every single other candidate running, including Jeb Bush, is she has universal recognition already," says Larry Sabato, the director of the Center for Politics at the University of Virginia. 

This argument is similar to the one being made by her campaign. They say everyone knows her name, but few know the real Hillary.

Blake Farmer

The number of farmers markets has more than quadrupled over the last 20 years, according to the USDA. The trouble has become defining what a farmers market is.

One of the country’s larger markets is going through a painful process of purging vendors who don’t meet a new “producer-only” standard.

“There’s nothing here. There’s no farmers,” retiree Walter Gentry says with a laugh, which echoes through the empty sheds of the Nashville Farmers’ Market. “I thought I could get some peaches here.”

Cars: hardware or software?

May 21, 2015
Kai Ryssdal

Modern technology and the law are running smack into each other at highway speeds.

At a recent copyright hearing, a lawyer for General Motors said that even after you pay off your car — even after you own every last nut, bolt, creak and rattle — GM still owns the software that basically makes modern day cars go.

What, then, are you doing when you buy a car? You're licensing the software.

Jack Dorsey: Twitter founder, Square CEO, punk

May 21, 2015
Kai Ryssdal, Tommy Andres and Mukta Mohan

You have about a 0.00006 percent chance of starting a billion-dollar business. Jack Dorsey didn't just start one — he's got two.

Dorsey was 29 when he launched Twitter with his pals Evan Williams, Biz Stone and Noah Glass back in 2006. His handle, @Jack, is Twitter's first personal account.

Marketplace for Thursday, May 21, 2015

May 21, 2015
Supreme Court of Appeals of West Virginia

The West Virginia Supreme Court says a circuit judge wrongly dismissed more than 50 criminal counts against a former Shepherd University administrator.

The court says in a Wednesday opinion that former Shepherd dean of student affairs Elizabeth A. Shanton can be prosecuted on the charges because they don't violate double jeopardy principles.

The U.S. Census Bureau says Charleston is hanging on as the only city in West Virginia with a population over 50,000, while Morgantown is now the state's third-largest city.

Census estimates released Thursday show Charleston had 50,404 residents in 2014. That's down about 1,000 from the 2010 Census.

gavel
wikimedia / Wikimedia

West Virginia authorities have arrested a Tennessee man charged with running over and killing his wife with a pickup truck.

Media outlets report that West Virginia State Police troopers arrested 38-year-old Chad Everette Henry of Henderson, Tennessee, on Wednesday at a pipeline yard near Bridgeport. State police say Henry had been working at the site.

Mon Power

Mon Power in West Virginia is using helicopters with giant saws attached to trim trees across the state.

The company said in a press release Wednesday they plan to use aerial saws to trim trees along 700 miles of transmission lines through the end of the year. The effort is meant to help lessen the frequency of weather-associated power outages.

El Salvador, divided by its first saint

May 21, 2015

The Governor's Blue Ribbon Commission on Highways released their final report this week, finding West Virginia needs an additional $1 billion annually to both maintain and expand the state's highway system.

The commission recommends keeping the tolls on the West Virginia Turnpike in order to leverage the road for a $1 billion road bond. The bond would be one time funds. Commissioners also recommend increases in some vehicle fees and taxes to create $141 million in new revenue.

PODCAST: New York as a lesson in economics

May 21, 2015
David Brancaccio

A new report from the OECD shows income inequality in many parts of the world including the U.S. The data shows the gap between the rich and poor is seven times larger than it was in the '80s. Plus, our senior economics contributor Chris Farrell talks about the economic lessons learned and taught by New York City.

How the Disney 'ecosystem' works

May 21, 2015
Nova Safo

Disneyland in California turns 60 this summer, and it's kicking off festivities with a big party this weekend. Revelers can stay overnight at Disney's theme parks in California and Florida.

But Disney, the media company, has more than a birthday to celebrate. A couple of weeks ago it reported second quarter profits that beat expectations—led by its theme parks and the film Frozen.

How can a film from two years ago still be a profit maker for the company?

Parent Gap Inc. benefits as Old Navy gets stylish

May 21, 2015
Gigi Douban

Clothing retailer Gap Inc. reports first-quarter results on Thursday. Revenue in 2014 totaled $16.2 billion, up 3.2 percent from the previous year. For the last four quarters, profit has gone up year-over-year by an average of 4 percent. But there's an interesting fragmentation within parent company Gap Inc. Last fiscal year, store sales fell 5 percent at Gap stores; Banana Republic's sales were also unimpressive. But at Old Navy, sales went up 5 percent.

Old Navy started out as a place where the whole family could pick up cheap fleece jackets and tank tops.

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