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Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A subcommittee designed to listen to public concerns and ideas about the Public Employees Insurance Agency will have four more meetings over the next few days, according to Governor Jim Justice.

 

The public outreach subcommittee for the PEIA Task Force will hold meetings in Wheeling, Weirton, Flatwoods, and Spencer.

There's still time to get your tickets to be in the audience for this Sunday's Mountain Stage featuring NRBQ, Kat Edmonson, Lindsay Lou, The Matchsellers, and The Wooks . But if you're not in the area, you can now join us from anywhere with an internet connection thanks to VuHaus and the WVPB Video Production department.

Just head on over to MountainStage.org or VuHaus.com at 7pm EST to watch along.

Last year on Inside Appalachia we aired an episode about Grandparents raising grandchildren. Our newsroom just won a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award for this series, so today, we’re listening back to this important story.  

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear a discussion about Tuesday's election results. Robert Rupp is a professor who teaches political science and history at West Virginia Wesleyan College. He’s studied state politics for 30 years. Jesse Wright spoke to him about the results of the primary election and what they might mean for the general election in November.

New Vision Renewable Energy

Instead of sending used political signs to the landfill, kids in Barbour County are using the signs in an anti-litter campaign.


Sergei Grits / Associated Press

The majority of ants entering the United States are coming not from their native countries, but from other regions, according to a new U.S. Forest Service study released this week, co-authored by a Morgantown entomologist.

Over the past two centuries, more than 400 insects have invaded the U.S. Some of those include ants. And although they are little, ants can cause big ecological problems worldwide including triggering outbreaks of sap-feeding insects because some non-native ant species keep away parasites.

West Virginia Governor's Office

West Virginia's Gov. Jim Justice says state casinos will be responsible for paying sports betting "integrity fees" if a new law comes to fruition. However, the announcement appears to have come prematurely from the governor’s office.

Brian Blauser/ Mountain Stage

The seeds of our Song of the Week were sown from a tune that Los Angeles area musician Joachim Cooder would sing to his houseplant, called a Fuchsia Machu Picchu.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, pregnancy-related and postpartum depression and anxiety are common - affecting anywhere from 10-20 percent of all mothers. As we head toward Mother’s Day, Kara Lofton talks with several women about their maternal mental health experience.

Ashley Rodgers, Texas Tech University

In today’s culturally polarized society, discussing whether the planet is warming and if humans have an impact on the climate is a topic that’s often avoided. Why? Because speaking about it can be akin to touching the “third rail” of religion and politics.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia’s Tuesday primaries saw an increase in voter participation compared to the last midterm primary, according to data provided by the Secretary of State’s office.

WV Culture Center
wvculture.org

West Virginia’s arts and culture just got a boost through a federal grant.

The National Endowment for the Arts, or NEA, awarded West Virginia nearly $800,000 this week to support programs that aim to preserve the state’s cultural history and promote arts education.

In this Thursday, May 3, 2018 photo, beekeeper Constantine Chlepas sits on a section of downed trees on the route of the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline near his property in Lindside, W.Va.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

George Jones was against the Mountain Valley Pipeline from the start.

The natural gas pipeline is routed to run through the southwest Virginia farm his family has owned for seven generations. The 88-year-old Navy veteran never considered signing an easement agreement with the developers, because he thought the whole thing seemed an affront to his property rights. But state law meant he couldn’t even keep surveyors out.

Having grown up in West Virginia and after living for three years in South Korea, the ongoing thaw in relations between North and South Korea got me thinking about the many similarities between the Koreas and the Virginias.

That’s not as far-fetched as it sounds. Start with something simple — the topography. My wife and I arrived in Seoul in fall of 2010 and, despite the fact that I had never been to Asia and could not read one street sign in Korean, there was something about the place that made me feel at home.

Courtesy of "hillbilly" filmmakers

RICHMOND, Ky. — Los Angeles-based filmmaker Ashley York visited her family in Jonesville, Kentucky, on Nov. 8, 2016, the day of the election that ushered Donald Trump into the Office of the President of the United States. She was accompanied by documentary cameras, capturing footage for her latest project.

pills
Wikimedia Commons

Legislators grilled representatives from five major opioid distributors Tuesday on how painkillers flooded West Virginia under their watch.

The House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing came as part of an investigation into why Cardinal Health, AmerisourceBergen, McKesson, Miami-Luken and H.D. Smith failed to report suspiciously large orders of opioid painkillers at the beginning of the addiction crisis.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we take a look at Tuesday's primary election. State Attorney General Patrick Morrisey won the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate, beating out five other candidates, including front-runners former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship and Congressman Evan Jenkins. As Dave Mistich reports, the race drew national attention as Republicans take aim at the seat held by Democratic incumbent Joe Manchin.

This story is part of a series on coal country by NPR's Embedded podcast. Episode audio is below.

On May 5, 2016, Donald Trump led a campaign rally in Charleston, W.Va.

He put on a hard hat and pretended he was shoveling coal. The crowd loved it.

Teachers hold a rally outside the Senate Chambers in the West Virginia Capitol Monday, March. 5, 2018 in Charleston, W.V. Hundreds of teachers from 55 counties were on strike for pay raises and better health benefits.
Tyler Evert / Associated Press

From Morgantown to Matewan, educators and their supporters pledged to "remember in November" the Republican state lawmakers who held out on the raise they demanded this winter during the teacher strike. On Tuesday, they went to the polls to, as some put it, "make them pay in May."

NOTE: This story will updated throughout the day as reports and results on the 2018 Primary Election come in. Results are unofficial until certified by the West Virginia Secretary of State's office. Check back for the latest news. 

View the Primary Election Results

Updated at 11:15 p.m. ET

Republicans may have avoided a possible electoral disaster in West Virginia with controversial coal baron Don Blankenship finishing third in the Senate primary to take on Democrat Joe Manchin, but voters gave the GOP establishment some warning signs in other places on Tuesday.

streams
Alokrohith / wikimedia commons

A federal appeals court was urged Tuesday to overturn a ruling by a judge who found that the state of West Virginia has abandoned its responsibility to write cleanup plans for streams harmed by pollution from mountaintop-removal coal mining.

Officials from various drugmakers answer questions on Capitol Hill Tuesday, May 8, 2018.
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Lawmakers of both parties accused wholesale pharmaceutical distributors on Tuesday of missing signs of suspicious activity that resulted in hundreds of millions of prescription opioid pills being shipped to West Virginia, a state disproportionately ravaged by deaths caused by the addictive drugs.

Bonnie's Bus
Courtesy of West Virginia University School of Medicine

A mobile mammography center known as Bonnie’s Bus is on the road again and taking appointments in West Virginia this month.

The bus will visit Martinsburg in the Eastern Panhandle May 17 and 18.

Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This legislative session, thousands of teachers and other school employees walked off the job and onto the grounds of the state capital to rally for better pay and benefits. Many have wondered how the nine-school-day strike might impact the coming elections.

Depending on who you ask, you’ll get some pretty different answers.

“I don’t think it had anything to do with the teacher’s strike at all,” said WV GOP chairwoman Melody Potter.

Democratic chairwoman, Belinda Biafore, had a different take.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, more than 68,000 West Virginians cast ballots early this year, according to the secretary of state’s office. That’s about 13,000 more than voted early in the 2014 midterm primary. Kara Lofton spoke with chairs of both the Republican and Democratic parties to talk about whether West Virginia’s recent teacher strike helped motivate the larger turnout.

Bob Bird / AP Photo

Having gone into effect at the beginning of this year, West Virginia's new voter identification law sees its first statewide election during the May 8  primaries. While state legislators responsible for passing the law say it strikes a balance, experts opposed to such measures -- here and elsewhere in the country -- say it is a "solution in search of a problem." Some organizations, though, are teaming with the Secretary of State's office for public outreach programs to help educate voters about the law and what they need to bring with them to the polls.

Mountain Stage with Larry Groce is about to get back into their schedule of live performances in Charleston, WV, starting this Sunday May 13 at the Culture Center Theater.

Tickets are still available online and at Taylor Books in downtown, Charleston.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In this Nov. 21, 1968, file photo, smoke pours from the burning Llewellyn portal of the Mountaineer Coal Co., where 78 miners are trapped near Farmington, W.Va.
AP file photo

Nearly half a century after an explosion tore through the Farmington No. 9 mine in West Virginia, the families of the 78 men who died there are still looking for justice.

Many of the children of the lost miners are now grandparents and older than their fathers ever were. Some have given up hope of ever holding anyone accountable for the disaster. But others are looking to a federal appeals court for some measure of closure.

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