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The victims of the Navy Yard shootings that brought panic and tragedy to a corner of Washington, D.C., on Monday morning are in many people's thoughts as their names and other information are released. We'll collect what we know about the victims here.

West Virginia Morning - September 16, 2013

Sep 16, 2013

On this WV Morning, a West Virginia native is finding success as a game show historian, and we take a minute to remember former WV Poet Laureate Irene McKinney.

A TRIBUTE: Celebrating Irene McKinney

Sep 16, 2013

Irene McKinney, poet, editor, and teacher, published seven collections of poetry, six during her lifetime including Vivid Companion and Six O’Clock Mine Report, and the most recent, published posthumously, Have You Had Enough Darkness Yet? The recipient of numerous awards, she served as WV’s Poet Laureate from 1994 until her death early last year.

Davis & Elkins increases enrollement by 68%

Sep 16, 2013

Davis & Elkins College recently announced admission figures which demonstrate the College’s fifth consecutive year of increased enrollment.

Davis & Elkins College reports a total growth of 65.8 percent since 2008. The Office of the Registrar reported the official figures for the new academic year totaling 847 full-time students, 318 are new students and 529 are returning students.

WV Native becoming game show historian

Sep 13, 2013
Bill Cullen hosts "Bank on the Stars" 1954
Courtesy Adam Nedeff

A West Virginia native is finding success as a game show historian.  Adam Nedeff grew up in Vienna and graduated from Marshall University in 2005.  His first book has just been published.  It's called "Quizmaster: The Life and Times and Fun and Games of Bill Cullen." Cullen was a popular game show host, first on radio beginning in the 1940's and ending his career on television in the 1980's.

   Here's Bill Cullen hosting the comedy quiz show "Walk a Mile" in 1952. A contestant named Greta is trying to explain how to make couscous.

Are excess tax levies the answer to dwindling school budgets? One such proposal has caused friction in Kanawha county.

Cabinet Secretary Rick Thompson held the 2nd of 5 meetings around the state yesterday to hear concerns from veterans about things like access to healthcare, and nursing homes. 

James McCormick is a 22-year veteran of the Iraq and Desert Storm Wars in the Army. He says there are many things vets in the state need.

“Well obviously access to healthcare is an important thing, the need for better understanding of PTSD and traumatic brain injuries and also we need to think about long-term care facilities for some of our aging veterans,” McCormick said.

West Virginia Morning - September 12, 2013

Sep 12, 2013

On this West Virginia Morning, how does gas drilling affect floodplains? That story and more.

Ashton Marra

As an officer in the Air National Guard, Boone County Republican Delegate Joshua Nelson is headed to his second mandatory service training in two years. In a press conference, Nelson announced new legislation he will introduce allowing military members like himself to participate in legislative votes while away for training or on active duty.

Nelson’s “Warrior/Legislator Act” would allow legislators who are members of the military to vote by electronic teleconferencing, either using new video technology like FaceTime or Skype or by telephone.

Cecelia Mason / WV Public Radio

Some members of the West Virginia Board of Education took a tour of the Schools for the Deaf and Blind in Romney, W.Va., Wednesday. The Board’s monthly meeting took place on the campus and  prior to the

Show Slide Show

meeting members walked through the facility to see how students are educated there and what kind of renovations are needed.

Gayle Manchin, board president, was impressed with some of the rooms she saw during the tour, commenting on how cozy they looked.

Sen. Jay Rockefeller
State of West Virginia / State of West Virginia

New policy that that would cut in half the amount of permissible coal dust in underground mines is making its way through federal agencies in the form of proposed rule and regulation changes

The same stricter standards are proposed in legislation introduced this summer by Sen. Jay Rockefeller.

day in Bluefield to discuss the increasing cases of Back Lung disease, noting more than 2000 West Virginia miners have died of Black Lung over the last decade.

WVSORO concerned about floodplains and gas drilling

Sep 11, 2013

The West Virginia Surface Owners Rights Organization is focusing its attention on how floodplains are used in natural gas drilling activity.

WVSORO co-founder Dave McMahon says because of the regulations on the books, surface owners aren't notified when gas drillers want to put equipment on floodplains. This is usually the case if the surface owner doesn't own the mineral rights.

McMahon says floodplain ordinances, implemented by counties, need to change accordingly to fix the gaps.

Gov. Tomblin
Dave Mistich

This morning Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin laid a wreath near the Fallen Firefighter’s Memorial on the State Capitol grounds to mark the twelfth anniversary of the attacks on September 11, 2001.

On this day 12 years ago, Governor Tomblin was serving as Senate President in the State Legislature. He said he first heard reports of the planes striking the World Trade Center as he was getting ready for the day while the legislature was in special session. Tomblin said he rushed to the Capitol and watched the rest of the day’s events unfold.

EarthEcho President Philippe Cousteau discusses the health of a trout fishing stream in Grant County W.Va. with Jenny Newland, Canaan Valley Institute executive director, for a documentary about the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
EarthEcho International / State of WV

Federal Budget Cuts, EarthEcho education project and black lung roundtable

EarthEcho - West Virginia will be one of the states featured in a new education project created by EarthEcho International that focuses on in the Chesapeake Bay. EarthEcho is launching a new multi-year expedition program that will focus each year on an environmental problem.

(We most recently updated this post at 4:02 p.m. ET.)

Amid reports that Syrian President Bashar Assad may be willing to give up his chemical weapons, as his strongest ally has suggested he do, the Obama administration expressed skepticism Tuesday.

Marshall University’s college of science is conducting an experiment that they hope will help them in the future.

The Marshall University College of Science installed a green roof in a small space just off the second floor of the science building. It’s the beginning of an experiment that will illustrate what it will take to maintain larger green roofs on the biotech building on campus. That building is being constructed. It’ll also play a role in Marshall’s continued effort to better handle storm water.

Chuck Somerville is the Dean of the College of Science.

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin
Courtesy Photo

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) continues to lobby for a bill he’s cosponsoring with Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) promoting a diplomatic solution to problems in Syria.

Manchin and Heitkamp have proposed a joint resolution that would give Syria’s president 45 days to agree to sign the Chemical Weapons Convention and comply with its provisions. The Convention prohibits the development, stockpiling or use of chemical weapons and requires they be destroyed.

At this point Manchin opposes the Obama Administration’s proposed limited military strike.

Dave Mistich

With the possibility of a U.S. attack on Syria still in limbo, a new poll released Monday by the Pew Research Center and USA Today suggests an overwhelming majority of Americans stand in opposition. A group sharing the same sentiment came together for a vigil in Charleston Monday night with hopes that Congress will hear their message.

  One Marshall University professor’s research is pretty unique. She’s examining the eastern diamondback rattlesnake, which isn’t in West Virginia. The research will take her to the Marine Corps training base in South Carolina. 

Jayme Waldron is an assistant professor of biology and conservation biologist. As a Marshall University undergrad she took part in studies looking at salamanders. That research took her to South Carolina where she gradually looked at reptiles and then rattle snakes.

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