Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

'I Will Stay Here, Because I Feel Free' - Kyra Soleil-Dawe's Struggle to Stay, Part Three

It’s nothing unusual to think about leaving your hometown after you graduate high school, but sometimes it’s not an option to leave, and sometimes, as we’ve heard, leaving can be difficult and expensive, too. The grass isn’t always greener on the other side.

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West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, tens of thousands of Boy Scouts are making their way to southern West Virginia today for the start of their National Jamboree. Ashton Marra reports on the preparations that began long before a single Scout set foot on the site.

We also hear from the Ohio Valley ReSource's Benny Becker, who is reporting on the Appalachian Connectivity Summit in Marietta, Ohio, where the Federal Communications Commission heard from Ohio Valley residents upset about poor internet service in rural communities.

Sunday dinner is a big deal in Deanna McKinney’s family. Deanna’s a de facto mom to her three sisters and two brothers -- when she moved to West Virginia from New York City, they came too.  These Sunday dinners are to remind the siblings that someone’s always got their back.

Deanna’s told the story of her son’s murder so many times, that she can recount it to me -- a relative stranger with a microphone -- while she picks out cornbread mix at the grocery store. His name was Tymel and his senseless death is an experience that has defined her life and informed who she is.

Pixabay

More than two million people across the Ohio Valley live in areas that lack any option for fast and reliable internet service. This week some of them had a chance to tell a member of the Federal Communications Commission what that means for their work, studies, and everyday life.

Courtesy Boy Scouts of America

Tens of thousands of boy scouts are making their way to southern West Virginia Wednesday for the start of their national jamboree, but preparations began long before a single scout sets foot on site.

Planning for the 2017 Boy Scouts of America National Jamboree began almost four years ago, immediately following the first jamboree held at the Summit Bechtel National Reserve. 

Listen: William Matheny on NPR's Mountain Stage

Jul 19, 2017
Josh Saul

This week's broadcast of Mountain Stage proudly introduces two very deserving West Virginia voices: the first in special guest host Joni Deutsch, and the second in Mannington native William Matheny in his solo debut.

Here he performs "Living Half to Death," from his new album Strange Constellations, on a show that also features sets by Lucius, Rachel Yamagata, Adia Victoria and Margaret Glaspy.

General John Hunt Morgan
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

On July 19, 1863, Confederate General John Hunt Morgan’s daring raid across Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio came to an end on Buffington Island, located in the Ohio River near Ravenswood in Jackson County.

Morgan’s raid was the only time a large Southern force entered Indiana or Ohio during the Civil War. His 2,400 raiders led local militias and growing numbers of Union troops on a wild chase across three states.

Shelley Moore Capito and Joe Manchin
Associated Press

West Virginia’s Republican U.S. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito said Tuesday that she won’t vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act without a replacement that meets the needs of the people in her state.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, President Trump has said the “war on coal” is over. But in the energy marketplace the power struggle continues. Even the Ohio Valley, where coal has long been king, the switch to natural gas is under way. In the second of two stories, Glynis Board reports on the public health effects of our energy choices. 

On July 18, 1877, Governor Henry Mathews arrived in Martinsburg—on the scene of the first nationwide strike in U.S. history. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad workers had walked off the job in response to a pay cut. The strike soon spread along the rails from Baltimore to Chicago.

  

The box of prescription drugs had been forgotten in a back closet of a retail pharmacy for so long that some of the pills predated the 1969 moon landing. Most were 30 to 40 years past their expiration dates — possibly toxic, probably worthless.

But to Lee Cantrell, who helps run the California Poison Control System, the cache was an opportunity to answer an enduring question about the actual shelf life of drugs: Could these drugs from the bell-bottom era still be potent?

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