Courtesy of Netflix / by Rebecca Kiger

Heroin(e): How Three Huntington Women Are Fighting the Opioid Crisis

As most know, the heroin and opioid crisis has reached stunning and heartbreaking heights across the nation. Huntington, West Virginia’s drug overdose death rate sits at ten times the national average.

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Kenneth King Collection, West Virginia State Archives

Us & Them: Two Tales of Coal

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Nexafed
Courtesy of Acura Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

A West Virginia-based pharmacy chain is hoping to combat the illegal manufacture of methamphetamine by stocking a tamper-resistant form of the drug used in its production.

Fruth Pharmacy, which has 27 locations in West Virginia and Ohio, announced it will begin stocking a drug called Nexafed. The tablet contains the active ingredient pseudoephedrine, similar to the popular brand-name allergy drug Sudafed.

State Civil War era newspapers going digital

Aug 20, 2013

Several hundred issues of state newspapers from the Civil War era are going to be digitized.

Several hundred issues of newspapers from Wheeling, Morgantown, Charleston and other state towns are being digitized.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Photographs depicting life in West Virginia and other parts of Appalachia have long been the subject of controversy. One documentary photographer with roots in the state’s southern coal fields is seeking to change that through his work but also has motives far more personal.

“The pictures have this visual context of Appalachia, or at least the mountains. Even if you don’t even know what Appalachia is, you can see this rural, country, mountain way of life,” said documentary photographer Roger May as he spoke about his project Testify.

Andy Pickens

Eight years ago three friends at Shepherd University started a band. The Demon Beat’s popularity grew from the restaurants and pubs around Shepherdstown to audiences across the state and region. The band just made a run around the state before taking a hiatus.

“Personally whenever I hear terms like ‘this is a garage rock band’ or ‘a back to basics raw sound’, those are just really tired phrases when you hear people talk about that,” said Morgantown musician and close friend of the band, Billy Matheny.

“When you listen to The Demon Beat and when you see them live, in both cases, I think it’s everything a rock experience should be. It is raw and it is immediate. More than anything, it’s fun to listen to. That’s kind of everything you want out of that experience,” he added.

Seventy-eight year old Royal Stokes was born in Washington, DC, grew up alongside the Chesapeake Bay, but now calls the mountains of West Virginia home.

  Following a distinguished academic career, Stokes hosted his own jazz program on public radio and wrote about jazz for The Washington Post.  He's written three books about jazz. His third book, entitled "Growing Up with Jazz" has just been released in paperback.  

Suzanne Higgins

Between the 1880’s and 1920’s there was an intersection of two historical phenomena in Appalachia. The railroads opened the region for the large scale extraction of coal and Jews from Eastern Europe came to the United States seeking opportunity.

In her book “Coalfield Jews: An Appalachian History,” Deborah Weiner writes “…their story is treated here as Jewish History and as Appalachian history, in equal measure.  The linkages that emerge between these two seemingly unrelated fields help to illuminate both.”

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30 Days of #WVMusic

Relive Season 2's Wild, Wonderful Music Interviews